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Steff Kranendijkx | Ex-Desso CEO


STAINABILITY


pet. But for the floor covering business, that carpet is getting greener he message is reuse and recycle. Now it has moved beyond what we use sing environmental problems Words | Richard Burton Photography | Monica Menez | Dezeen.com


recycled fi shing nets, as illustrated here in this special photoshoot by the fashion photographer Monica Menez which was designed to off er a new “perspective on how carpets can shape a space”. The collection was intended to help and support interior architects by giving them greater freedom to defi ne the atmosphere and purpose


of diff erently sized surface areas. “The collection was devised fi rmly with a spatial perspective in mind,” according to Tilla Goldberg, Director of Product Design at the Ippolito Fleitz Group, a multidisciplinary design studio in Stuttgart founded by Peter Ippolito and Gunter Fleitz in 2002. Even the names they chose are inspiring: each intended to, not only


provide orientation within the collection, but convey a joy in the textiles. For example, Meet x Beat is said to have an expressive force where quality shines through, making it appear “natural, crafted and distinctive in a tactile way”. Words such as woolly, voluminous and graphic are said to describe the independent blend of the loop look. It comes in 13


DOMOTEX MAGAZINE 2021 BACK TO CONTENTS


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