search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
COMMUNICATION


manager at Astra Zenica Travel Service), argues that to “pick up keywords” clients use in describing their goals and objectives can be an effective way to build trust and make messages more relevant to each group. “But to be relevant, the most


important thing is truly to under- stand their needs and link the message to the company’s or maybe the department’s objectives,” she explains.


GETTING TO THE POINT AND


BEING SUCCINCT Catherine McGavock, regional vice-president, EMEA, at the trade association The Global Business Travel Association (GBTA), stresses the importance of “not burying the message in too much waffle”, getting to the point and being succinct. “You are the travel expert. Don’t assume others will understand your role, your travel policies, procedures and strategies,” says McGavock. “This is your opportunity to sell the benefits of a travel programme using metrics relevant to the audience. For example, the finance team will be interested in the cost-saving aspects, while HR will be more interested in duty-of-care.” McGavock also points out that the GBTA recently


supported a client move from a lengthy 38-page policy to a more succinct one-page infographic, which “travellers, of course, highly praised”.


SHOW EMPATHY – AND MAKE SURE


YOU ARE LISTENING “Listening to the other person is important as you’re lis- tening to their concerns; it’s not just a tick-box exercise,” maintains the Church of England’s Day. “One thing I’ve learned from a life in procurement is that some people have some good ideas to help the system get better.” Day points out that clients habitually deliver helpful suggestions to make communication smoother and easier. For example, instead of labouring through 15 pages of text, which fulfils various “tick boxes”, one client suggested combining “a few of these pages together and making it five pages”, which benefits everybody and makes, for instance, the booking process quicker, easier and simpler. “There’s a huge value in listening to people because we work with people who’ve done what they’ve been doing for a number of years and have some very good ideas on making things work better for everybody,” he adds. “It’s absolutely essential to show empathy,” adds Inside Out Image’s Gaudoin. “You have to know your audience and, for instance, for a meeting with a law firm I changed some of my clothing as well as how I expressed myself


buyingbusinesstravel.com


YOU NEED TO START TALKING ABOUT WHAT YOU’RE GOING TO DO WHEN THINGS GO WRONG


because you have to engage people where they’re at. It’s thinking about being in another person’s shoes really, which a lot of people find very difficult.”


BUILD RELATIONSHIPS


Supplier relationship management is a priority for a successful travel programme, says Festive Road’s Anders- son. “This means mapping out your key suppliers and ensuring you spend the right amount of time with the right suppliers,” she says. “Companies that invest time in building relationships with key suppliers, share company strategies and find opportunities for a win-win partner- ship will most likely get the best negotiation results. It’s what we like to call the ‘selling buyer’ and we believe it’s actually the buyer’s job to ‘sell’ their programme to the supplier to access preferential status. Hoda Lacey, author of Powerful Win Win Solutions: A Practical Toolkit for Resolving Conflict in the Workplace, has worked on both sides of the travel business, training buyers as well as TMCs. “In the travel business, you need to get to know each other personally,” she says. “There’s much more conflict when you talk on the telephone and you don’t know the person on the other end. “The first thing you need to do – if you’re working on either side of the business – is meet in person and say, ‘Okay, let’s talk about how we’re going to work together; let’s talk what we’re going to do and how you’re going to work with me’,” she asserts.


2019 JANUARY/FEBRUARY 91


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160