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WORDS MOLLY DYSON


INFORM


UBER PLEDGES ‘CLEAN AIR FEE’ FOR LONDON


UBER WILL INTRODUCE a new fee in London in 2019 in a bid to help drivers buy electric vehicles. The scheme is part of Uber’s “Clean Air Plan”, which aims to have every car on the app in the capital to be fully electric by 2025 in an effort to aid pollution-cutting efforts in London. Customers will be charged a 15p per mile


“clean air fee”. Uber says the full fee will go towards helping drivers upgrade to an electric vehicle, with the average journey in London yielding around 45p. Drivers using the app an average of 40 hours per week can gain up to £1,500 each year towards buying an electric vehicle. Uber predicts 20,000 drivers will upgrade to electric cars by the end of 2021.


BUYERS CHECK IN TO SERVICED APARTMENTS


NEARLY ONE-THIRD OF CORPORATE TRAVEL buyers increased their use of serviced apartments in 2018, according to a survey conducted by the Business Travel Show – up from the 20 per cent recorded in 2017. The number of buyers who don’t use


serviced apartments dropped from 42 per cent in 2017 to 32 per cent this year, while 35 per cent used the same amount and just 4 per cent decreased usage. This is compared to the jump in buyers


TRAVELPORT: ONE-THIRD OF TRAVELLERS USE VOICE SEARCH


UK TRAVELLERS are increasingly embracing innovative digital travel tools, with more than one-third (36 per cent) using voice search tools, such as Siri and Alexa, to research trips, according to Travelport. Its research, carried out by Toluna Research, also found that two-thirds of


travellers are open to offering personal biometric data to allow for biometric screening at airport security if it reduces waiting times. The survey of 16,200 travellers across 25 countries revealed that more


than one-third of respondents now use digital payment wallets or payment apps while travelling. Furthermore, 34 per cent find it “very painful” when they are not able to


access booking information on all of their devices, while 26 per cent feel pictures and videos on social media have the greatest influence over their travel choices.


buyingbusinesstravel.com


who chose not to use sharing economy accommodation options – 45 per cent versus 38 per cent in 2017’s survey – showing companies are seeing serviced apartments as a way to balance policy with the traveller experience. Buyers are also allocating a higher


proportion of their budget to serviced apartments. In 2016, 90 per cent of buyers spent less than 10 per cent on the accommodation option. That figure has fallen to 77 per cent. And 17 per cent allocated 11-25 per cent of their budget, compared to 7 per cent in 2016. The survey was carried out in


partnership with the Association of Serviced Apartment Providers (ASAP). ■ For a preview of the Business Travel Show, turn to p94-97


2019 JANUARY/FEBRUARY 19


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