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GREEN INNOVATION


natural habitats and endangered species, and provides livelihoods for indigenous people in countries including Madagascar, Indonesia and Peru.” It’s a calculation that can also be per- formed by a TMC, says D’Arcy. “If a company has a sustainable policy then we, as agents, can help them to manage it. For example, we calculate carbon emissions by flight which can be reported back to the client.” Buyers can use one of a growing number of accreditation schemes that rate and rank travel organisations by their sustainability policies. Options include Eco Vadis, which assesses companies across 21 criteria, or Travellife, a certification scheme for tourism companies committed to sustainability, which recently accredited Canadian Affair and parent company, Transat. Finally, but arguably most crucially, travel buyers need to ensure the whole company is engaged in working toward more sustain- able travel, from the boardroom all the way down. Clear internal policies, incentivised


KPIs and engagement days or workshops on sustainability can all help. Platforms such as Do Nation allow individuals or organisations to make a pledge, create personalised campaigns and track data on progress. It’s a system already used by Network Rail, Ella’s Kitchen and Pukka Herbs. “We’re seeing growing demand for Do


Nation, which helps encourage employees to make sustainable travel choices,” says found- ing director Hermione Taylor. She doesn’t find the growth surprising either. “With climate change on the public and business agendas in a big way, more businesses are looking at what they and their employees can do to create a positive impact.” As UN scientists have spelled out, the time for making a difference is now. “We don’t have much time,” says Lanza Tech’s Burton. “The reality is it has to be in the short term and happen as soon as possible. The recent IPCC report has hopefully been a catalyst for people to say we need to do something, and we need to do it now.”


THE IPCC’S GOAL


In 2015, the Paris Climate Agreement set two goals for limiting global warming: “well below 2°C” and the more ambitious 1.5°C. In last year’s report, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) said hitting the latter would require “societal transformation”. To give us a 66 per cent chance, the world needs to be carbon neutral by 2047. That would require sourcing 70-85 per cent of electricity from renewables by 2050 and using technology to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Even if that is achieved, the world faces more heatwaves, floods and droughts, but would avoid the catastrophe of 2°C with dramatically rising sea levels.


buyingbusinesstravel.com


2019


JANUARY/FEBRUARY


143


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