search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
figure rose to 75 per cent of travellers in the UK. Although road warriors


expect employers to contact them quickly in an emergency, travellers themselves are more likely to contact family, friends or colleagues if they need assistance (42 per cent), rather than their supervisor (38 per cent), HR department (30 per cent) or travel manager (27 per cent). Jessica Collison, GBTA’s director of research, says: “As many travellers continue to book outside of corporate tools through alternative channels,


DATA 41%


business travellers who chose to book direct with a supplier because it was more convenient


booking booking Air 79% buyingbusinesstravel.com 76% 56%


business travellers who added leisure time to a work trip in 2018


TOP 5 MOST IMPORTANT FEATURES FOR BOOKING APP Hotel


Support during emergencies


76%


Destination safety alerts


74% 31%


business travellers who expect their organisation to


be responsible for their safety on added leisure days


Travel safety alerts


72% 2019


TRAVELLERS (WITH OBT ACCESS) BOOK FLIGHTS IN 2018?


HOW DID


COMPANY ’S ONLINE BOOKING TOOL :


COMPANY ’S TR AVEL AGENCY OR DEPARTMENT:


DIRE CT WITH AIRLINE :


ONLINE TR AVEL AGENCY:


83% 74% 68% 67%


SOURCE: HOW TECHNOLOGY IMPACTS TRAVELLER BEHAVIOUR AND SAFETY, GBTA AND SAP CONCUR JANUARY/FEBRUARY 35


the lack of visibility this creates has critical implications for both travel spend and the ability to meet duty-of-care responsibilities. “Travellers have high


expectations of their employers when it comes to their safety as the majority expect their corporates to proactively contact them within two hours of an emergency. This is despite the fact that most would not contact their organisation if they were in urgent need of assistance, leaving the responsibility solely on the company.”


However, SAP Concur’s Tetaz


says this is how it should be. “In an emergency situation, whether it’s a natural disaster or terrorist attack, I truly think businesses are responsible for their travellers’ safety. “To react quickly and to


be able to identify and locate employees within minutes is absolutely imperative. What this research shows is that when solving this challenge, no matter whether travellers have booked via their OBT or outside of it, travel bookings should be made visible to the business.”


■ How Technology Impacts Traveller Behaviour and Safety by GBTA in partnership with SAP Concur surveyed 1,252 business travellers in the UK, Germany, France, the Nordics, Belgium and the Netherlands.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160