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INFORM


WORDS MOLLY DYSON


NORWEGIAN ANNOUNCES NEW TRANSATLANTIC ROUTES


LOW-COST CARRIER NORWEGIAN has announced three new transatlantic routes from Gatwick to Rio de Janeiro, Miami and San Francisco, for its summer 2019 schedule.


The four flights a week service to Rio will


begin on 31 March and will operate on Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Sunday utilising a Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner aircraft with both economy and premium cabins.


Outbound flights will leave London at 1200, arriving in Rio at 1925 local time, while the return journey departs at 2225 and lands at 1335. Flights to Miami and San Francisco in the US will


also begin on 31 March. The Miami service will operate on a daily basis – up from the four flights a week to Fort Lauderdale that operated last summer – while the San Francisco service will operate five times a week.


QUINTESSENTIALLY TRAVEL REBRANDS CORPORATE DIVISION


QUINTESSENTIALLY TRAVEL, which acquired London-based CJL Total Travel Management in 2016, has rebranded its corporate travel division Quintessentially Corporate Travel Management (QCTM). Launched in 1971, CJL is known as a


high-touch boutique TMC and has been a long-standing member of Advantage Business Travel and the Focus Partnership. As the business travel management


arm and specialist corporate division of Quintessentially Travel, QCTM offers a global travel management solution, with offices in London and New York.


20 JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2019 CAA gets tough with Ryanair


THE CAA HAS STARTED “enforcement action” against Ryanair over the carrier’s continued refusal to compensate UK-based customers under EU261/2004 rules. Ryanair passengers faced hundreds of


cancellations last summer as pilots and cabin crew across Europe took strike action in a row over working conditions. The airline claimed it was not legally


Michael O’Leary, chief executive, Ryanair


required to compensate customers because the strikes were allegedly incited by staff from rival carriers and were, therefore, “out of its control”. At the time, Ryanair offered passengers a full refund or the option of taking an alternative flight. A court in Barcelona upheld Ryanair’s reasoning, finding the strikes were extraordinary circumstances under the regulation. Passengers were entitled to escalate their claims to AviationADR – a


body approved by the CAA that provides alternative dispute resolutions. However, Ryanair is terminating its agreement with AviationADR. Now the CAA is taking action against the airline, passengers with unresolved claims will have to wait until the outcome of the CAA’s deliberations. For AviationADR, Ryanair accounted for the largest portion of


compensation claims received last year, at 30 per cent of all appeals. ■ Turn to Talk Back, p151, for a discussion of this issue


buyingbusinesstravel.com


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