search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
INFORM


WORDS MOLLY DYSON


TRAVELPORT ACQUIRED FOR $4.4BN


STAYCITY OPENS FOURTH DUBLIN PROPERTY


APARTHOTEL COMPANY STAYCITY opened its fourth property in Dublin in December, offering customers a choice of 50 apartments. Located on Dublin 8’s Chancery Lane, the property features 49 studios


that each accommodate up to two guests, as well as one two-bedroom apartment sleeping up to four people. On-site facilities include a Staycafe serving hot and cold drinks, as well as guest laundry and 24-hour reception. All apartments come with air conditioning, high-speed broadband, flat-


screen TV, rainfall shower, Hypnos beds and a kitchen with dishwasher, fridge, twin hob and combo microwave/oven.


TRAVELPORT HAS SIGNED AN agreement to be acquired by two specialist private equity firms for US$4.4 billion. Affiliates of Siris Capital


Group, LLC and Evergreen Coast Capital Corp signed the deal for the all-cash transaction, which will see them buy all outstanding common shares in Travelport. The sale is expected to be completed in Q2 of 2019.


REPORT SLAMS RAIL INDUSTRY


MPs ON THE TRANSPORT COMMITTEE have said last summer’s rail chaos should be a catalyst for “genuine change” and labelled the rise in fares this year as “adding insult to injury” for passengers. The committee also said season ticket holders on the worst-affected lines should receive a discount on their 2019 tickets “equivalent to the price rise”. The report, Rail timetable changes: May 2018, concluded that the chaos caused by new timetables was partly due to the “astonishing complexity” of the fragmented railway system. MPs said the system could not cope with the scale of the change, which affected more than half the railway network.


22 JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2019


MPs also put some of the blame on transport secretary Chris Grayling, saying he had the “ultimate authority to judge the trade-offs between competing commercial interests”. While the committee conceded Grayling did not receive all relevant information, they said he should have been “more proactive” and so cannot “absolve himself completely of all responsibility”. Grayling has shifted blame on to rail operators


and Network Rail. He has opened a review of the rail industry, which is due to produce a whitepaper by this autumn. He has also told Govia Thameslink Railway (GTR) to contribute £15 million towards “tangible improvements for passengers”.


buyingbusinesstravel.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160