search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
IN FOCUS


OLIFE THE


THER ON


ON THE MAP Travel exploded for me after I won the World Class accolade in 2010. I travel for competitions, to train other bartenders and present special cocktail menus, as well as travelling to discover new bars. With competitive bartending, I get over nerves by being friendly. I treat judges as though they were my guests, talking them through everything I’m doing as I make them a cocktail. The year after winning World Class, I was named International Bartender of the Year, and I’ve also been voted Conde Nast Bartender of the Year and Personality of the Year by the drinks magazine Imbibe.


BEAUTY SLEEP I book direct or through a travel agent unless I’m travelling for a company that will book for me. I have no problem flying economy in Europe, but prefer business for long-haul where you get extras like a wonderful face mask they gave me on JAL which moisturises while you fly.


Flying JAL and wearing a moisturising face mask


Erik Lorincz, former head of The Savoy’s American Bar, and a Diageo World Class Global Winner, talks about his travels with his cocktail shaker


SHAKEN, NOT STIRRED I was a consultant on the Bond movie Skyfall. I taught four actors how to make a perfect martini. That meant holding the bottle by the neck and other moves which are hallmarks of a professional bartender. I was asked to create a special cocktail for the after-party at the royal premiere, and created one based on gin and vodka; people still ask me for the Skyfall cocktail.


Lorincz taught four actors on the Skyfall set how to make the perfect martini


SHELLING OUT


I minimise stress by making sure I pack all the cocktail kit I’m going to need and not putting it in checked luggage in case it gets separated from me. And I’ve learnt from experience to use hard shell cases for checked luggage.


LOUNGING AROUND I travel in Asia a lot, and always enjoy Singapore because it’s so easy to get into the city. If I have a few hours layover there, I’ll go into town and discover a new restaurant. When layovers mean staying in the airport, I like the Iberia lounge in Madrid, which has an amazing selection of food.


PERFECT TIMING When flying, I’ll have a glass of wine with food, but I take a litre bottle of water onboard and try to finish it. I find it easy to sleep on flights but I’ll change my watch to the destination time before take-off so I know how to behave; there’s no point sleep- ing if I’m arriving at midnight and need to get used to a new bedtime.


10 JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2019 buyingbusinesstravel.com


ON THE MENU I left The Savoy last year to develop my own bar, which I’m about to open at Momo in Mayfair. I’m still working on the name. I’ll travel less once it’s open, but I won’t give up. I’ve visited 56 countries so far, and I know there are at least 100 left to see.


Lorincz is looking forward to the opening of his new cocktail bar at Momo in Mayfair


LOCATION, LOCATION If I’m going to drink a cocktail, it will reflect a sense of place; a fruit drink with rum feels right in the Caribbean; a gin- based cocktail in London and in Scotland it has to be whisky. The key to impressing with a cocktail when entertaining is to find out whether the guest prefers a sweet, sour, bitter or savoury cocktail.


SIDE


CREDIT JURAJ ROHAC


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160