search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
INFORM


WORDS MAT THEW PARSONS


BUILDING MOMENTUM


More than 1,100 delegates attended the GBTA and VDR’s fifth joint conference in Berlin at the end of November, to take stock of the European business travel scene


THE GBTA, ALONG WITH THE German business travel buyer association VDR, themed their event “Momentum”, with panels and debates on emerging trends. One session on the centre stage,


“Airline C-Level Panel – The 2020 Vision on Aviation”, brought together three leading airline executives. Moderator Steve Dunne, of Digital


Drums, set the scene stating IATA has predicted the number of passengers flying globally will double by 2030. He asked whether the global infrastructure could cope with an increase of that size. Heike Birlenbach, senior vice- president sales at Lufthansa, said air traffic in Europe was expected to increase by 53 per cent, but air traffic infrastructure needs to be improved today. She said Lufthansa was “pushing hard for a collaboration of politics, airlines and airports”.


The panel was quizzed on Brexit, and Dunne asked Birlenbach how Lufthansa is preparing. She replied: “Air traffic and traffic rights are the biggest risks for Lufthansa, as well as supply chain management and border control, but we are getting prepared and we hope for a smooth transition to 2020.” Shai Weiss, incoming chief executive of Virgin Atlantic, said he thought a hard Brexit would be harmful to the economy and consumers.


Dunne said NDC is entering a pivotal phase. Juha Jarvinen, chief commercial officer, Finnair, spoke of its benefits, saying it was a “valid” technology. Finnair was not able to offer its full product range to corporate travellers, so it had to find the technology to do it. “NDC is giving us that… but we acknowledge it has an impact on business travel agents,” he said. Dunne also highlighted Virgin Atlantic’s absence from IATA’s NDC “leader list”, and Weiss stated his airline was focusing on the consumer side, but that it would evaluate its position this year.


STAYING AHEAD A later session, “Turning the Tables – Buyers Take Centre Stage”, saw Gehan Colliander, global head of travel at The Boston Consulting Group, and Mark Cuschieri, head of global travel management at UBS, face questions on the centre stage.


26 JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2019


They were asked how they stayed innovative, despite having mature travel programmes. Colliander said organisations needed to incorporate elements of what was seen in the wider industry, such as voice recognition in hotels, and merge that into individual travel programmes, and then “marry it up with company culture”. She went on to say that being mature was “not an excuse for not being an innovator”. Cuschieri added that UBS “tried to drive change, and accept change” and said you needed the right partners for a programme alongside a focus on the “digitalisation” of a travel programme. ■ This year’s GBTA conference takes place in Munich, 19-21 November


WE’RE MORE THAN A CAR RENTAL COMPANY


Konstantin Sixt, board member of sales, Sixt, was interviewed by Mike McCormick, executive director and chief operating officer, GBTA. Konstantin revealed the car hire firm’s plans to diversify its offering with “connected cars”. At German airports, customers


can use the Sixt app to open the car. “In the future, the cars will be everywhere. It’s really true mobility that we will offer here,” he said. Sixt has also invested €100 million


in tracking and diagnostic technology as part of its new software platform.


buyingbusinesstravel.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160