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SycamoreLED.com| ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE


Gary Wilson


Lighting should be an essential part of any retail experience and SycamoreLED.com is using its own showroom to demonstrate to customers just how much simple changes can bring a display to life. We spoke to sales director Gary Wilson…


Light up your showroom


The SycamoreLED.com showroom is designed to demonstrate the transformative power of lighting in any KBB design


Q & A


Q: You’ve obviously made a defi nite decision in your showroom design to put lighting in real environments. Why was that so important? A: It’s very simple really, when people come to see us we want to show them how lighting looks and feels in a real life situation. It’s all about the experience of being in the showroom and you can only really fully appreciate how good these products are when you see them in situ. It makes everything so much more aspirational and it illustrates the effectiveness of the right lights in the right environment better than anything else. Lighting is now so ingrained in the aesthetic of the kitchen that it needs to be seen there in a showroom environment.


Q: It’s not simply about displaying product though? A: Like all good showrooms, it is designed to be very adaptable and we do a lot of training in there. We train designers, retailers and manufacturers and we encourage them to use our showroom as an extension of their own when they want to specifi cally talk about lighting with their clients. Our guys are also out doing many training courses around the country and that just demonstrates how far we’ve come and how important lighting now is to all areas of the KBB sector.


Q: Tell me about the Innovation Centre? A: We have an absolutely vital area within the showroom that we call the Innovation Centre. It’s where we have all the new products that are


June 2019 · kbbreview


under development that may become part of range in the future. We take our clients in there and show them what we’re up to so we can get really constructive feedback before rolling them out into the main showroom.


Q: So input from clients is a really important part of that showroom journey? A: Talking – and listening – to customers is absolutely vital. They can ask us to change things or develop new things and we take that on board and come up with the best possible solutions. That’s all part of what makes a showroom visit a true experience and makes for a real conversation and relationship with the customer.


Q: The choice of lighting available is now virtually endless so how do you help people narrow those options down? A: We always encourage designers to include the lighting on every design right from the beginning and let the customer take it off if they want to. We need to help people understand that lighting isn’t an add-on; it’s an essential part of any project. We have a design service here with a team that will do free lighting design for our customers. They’re here to help the kitchen, bedroom or


bathroom designers put the right solution together for their clients, whatever the requirements, and it means that expertise is available when they need it. This is especially true when there are quite complicated ideas and they know what they want without necessarily knowing how to achieve it. They know that the right lighting really brings added value to their designs.


Q: Do you think there’s still an issue with how lighting is used in KBB showrooms? Do retailers take full advantage of what’s available? A: There’s no question that I’ve seen many showrooms myself that need to use much better lighting to not only create ambience but also to show off their displays in the best way. The biggest mistake many make is that they’re actually overlit – not just in the furniture but also in the ceiling. It’s far too bright and it totally washes out the colour of the furniture and does it a real disservice. When you go to a subtler and thought-through scheme it really brings it to life, and makes it look like a real home. My advice will always be to take advice and utilise our experience and expertise to create the best possible lighting solutions together.


Q: What advice would you give to a retailer who wants to make an instant difference with their showroom lighting? A: We have worked with a lot of customers to enhance existing displays and that can make a huge difference – it’s so simple to upgrade. New displays are expensive so my advice would be to think about breathing new life into existing room sets by retrofi tting new lighting technology – the cost is relatively small but it brings a new vigour to that old display.


For more information on the new Sycamore range please contact sales@sycamoreled.com or call 0113 286 6686


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