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July, 2020


www.us- tech.com


New Palletizer from FlexLink Simplifies Complex Processes


Allentown, PA — FlexLink’s new semi-open pal- letizing cell with an industrial robot arm simplifies the complex processes of a traditional palletizer. The easy-to-use unit can be up and running in a few hours and its advanced safety system and two loading docks permit a capacity increase of up to five percent. The RI20 palletizer is suitable for palletizing


closed boxes in high-throughput environments. The unit includes enhanced safety features that allow operators to be near the robot during produc- tion.


The presence of operators in the safety area


dynamically adjusts the speed of the robot, instead of stopping it completely, reducing unnecessary downtime. Two pallet loading docks create a seamless pallet exchange that allows them to be filled in suc- cession. The compact design of the unit


can save up to 40 percent of floor space when compared with a heavy robot palletizer. The main frame does not have to


be attached to the floor and the RI20 can be moved easily with a forklift. The palletizing unit can be relocated in a few hours and can be used on multiple lines in the same day. The unit has an intuitive, web-


based pallet pattern manager and does not require robot programming. It takes less than 10 minutes to set up a new program or just a few clicks to load an existing pattern. The RI20 is available with sev-


eral options: a rigid interlayer mod- ule, Robot Config software, a portable


ASTER Launches Comparative Data Checker


Colorado Springs, CO — As the de- sign of a product evolves, it becomes increasingly difficult to understand what has changed from one iteration to the next. However, with ASTER Technologies’ new comparative data checker, users can instantly deter- mine the differences between two versions of a project. Users can ana- lyze both attributes and graphical comparisons to assess design changes. ASTER’s product and engineer-


ing teams have partnered to enhance the standard configuration currently available within TestWay Express and QuadView. The new functionalities offer


the ability to toggle between differ- ent views, track component position, and provide a test tab that itemizes the differences between part value and tolerance, pin connectivity and solder mask size, as well as test points and nails. The “Assembly” tab is part of


the standard configuration of Test- Way Express and Quadview and is


available free of charge. Contact: ASTER Technologies,


P.O. Box 7163, Colorado Springs, CO 80933 % 719-264-7698 E-mail: will.webb@aster-technologies.com Web: www.aster-technologies.com


RI20 semi-open palletizing cell.


tablet, a remote assistance package, a preventive info package, and a data collection package. Features include: KUKA KR20 R1810 Cy-


bertech or FANUC M-20iA/35M robot arm; suction cups for single or double pick; a payload of up to 33 lb (15 kg); 12 cycles per minute; 7.2 ft (2.2m) pallet height for EUR pallets and 6.6 ft (2m) height for INDU and US pallets; closed box measurements from 5.5 x 7.9 x 4.3 to 19 x 23.6 x 19 in. (140 x 200 x 110 to 480 x 600 x 480 mm); and a footprint of


12.8 x 13.5 ft (3.9 x 4.1m), including infeed. Contact: FlexLink Systems, Inc., 6580 Snow-


drift Road, Allentown, PA 18106 % 610-973-8200 E-mail: info.us@flexlink.com Web: www.flexlink.com


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