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KEEPING YOU IN TOUCH - YOUR FREE MONTHLY NEWSPAPER DELIVERED DOOR-TO-DOOR FOR 30 YEARS


KITCHENor BEDROOM NEED A FACELIFT?


Made to measure high quality replacement doors, drawer fronts and accessories. Largest choice of colours and


designs. Keep existing carcasses or add more if required Optional new appliances and worktops etc


From £399


Call NOWfor FREE Home Survey 01228 590003


Covering all of Cumbria, North Lancashire and the Borders BUY DIRECT FROM THE MANUFACTURER


Southwells UK Limited Unit 9, Kingmoor Works Kingmoor Road, Carlisle Cumbria CA3 9QJ


www.southwellsuk.com ORCAS


JACK FORRESTER


Autumn/Winter Problem Pests Rats, Mice, Birds and Cluster Flies


CIEH - New Food Hygiene certificate changes To know more please call 01900 824783


Full Pest Control Service


• Fly Screens & Curtains for insect proofing • Bird Control and Proofing • Woodworm Specialists (FREE quote & advice) • House and Garden Clearances


• Environmental Fumigations and Cleaning • Full Washroom Service & Supply... SAVE £s • CIEH - Health and Safety and Food Hygiene training


For a fast and ef ficient service call 01900 824783 or email mike@cumbriapestservices.co.uk


We would like to thank all our customers for their support!


The recent, stunning BBC documentary series Blue Planet II once again took us under the surface of the sea into a mysterious, almost alien world. It is thought that we actually know more about the surface of the moon than the floor of the ocean! The waters surrounding the UK, host a diverse variety of marine life. The nutrient-rich waters of the Irish Sea attract many species of marine life, such as leatherback turtles and basking sharks. Very occasionally, the Irish Sea is visited by one of the world’s top predators: the orca.


The orca (also known as ‘killer whale’) is the largest member of the dolphin family and is distinguished by its black and white pattern and enormous dorsal fin. Orcas are highly social animals, usually hunting in packs, using complex co-ordinations to sweep seals off detached small ice islands, or by jumping on unsuspecting seals sunbathing, dragging them to the deep. The name ‘killer whale’ was first given its name by sailors who observed orcas hunting and killing whales.


There are two types of orcas (type 1 and type 2) present in the North Atlantic that are differentiated by their hunting strategies and social structures. The only resident population of orcas in Britain and Ireland, the West Coast Community, are type 1. Type 1 orcas are the smaller of the two, with worn-down teeth specially designed for their diet, which consists mainly of herring, mackerel and seals. These orcas are highly intelligent, with complex family structures and hunting strategies, attributed to them having one


INFO@THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK


of the largest brains in the ocean. For example, when hunting herring, they will work together to force the herring into a dense ball, then use their tails to slap the water which temporarily stuns the fish, thus making them easy prey.


Orca females also share one of the same biological functions as human females, the process of menopause. Why this occurs has been debated for some time, although evidence suggests that female orcas take up a kind of grandmother role within a pack, devoting most of their time to bringing up their grandchildren.


The orca is under threat within the UK, as no calves have been observed in the only resident population (a small group of five females and four males) for the past 25 years. This is thought by some to be the result of toxic substances which have passed up through the food chain. It would be a tragedy to lose this population.


The West Coast Community, patrol a huge area to the west of Britain and Ireland, from the southern Irish Seam, to the north of Outer Hebrides and west along the entire length of the west coast of Ireland. It is rare to see orcas off our coast close to shore; however, past sightings have occurred around late May and early June.


Find out more about how the Wildlife Trust in the North West are working together to protect all our Irish Sea wildlife at www.irishsea.org.


21 DECEMBER 2017 ISSUE 421 PAGE 14


SHOWROOM IS NOW OPEN


NEW


Images©Audun Rikardsen


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