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Another of the ‘regulars’ – Harry White and


colleague on the Members’ Hill in 1933 (Brooklands Museum).


mentioned after the 10th September 1932 pro- gramme. The August 1935 edition of Speed states, ‘...the Brooklands Tote is now a first-aid station.’ As well as the Tote bus in the Paddock, the major bookies like ‘Long Tom’ (Thomas Harris), Alf Leach (‘The Motor King’), Lioney Ingram, Jack Linton and George Cooper were to be found alongside the Finishing Straight railings. Located in the various hillside enclosures were the likes of Lionel Pearce, Alf Prince, Tom Cox, Harry White and Tom Collins. Others, such as Harry Jay, Fred Carter, Alf Austin and Bill Collins, set themselves


Lioney Ingram plying his trade (Brooklands Museum).


up in the spectator areas at the Fork. The spectators would have varied from the knowledgeable motor racing enthusiast to the casual observer of fast cars. As well as the warnings in the race cards and the information on betting odds on the bookies’ slates, they could gather further details from the likes of Sporting Life which published anti-post odds and even fore- casting tips. Motor Sport in the early 1930s added starting prices on cars which won or were placed in BARC races to its race reports. Having assessed the competitors and noted the odds, those wishing to place a bet would have approached their selected bookmaker with cash in hand. Just how much is not known, but it would appear that the sum of money wagered on cars and their drivers did not match the wads of notes put on horses and their jockeys. ‘Long Tom’s thoughts on ‘Making a Book at Brooklands’ (The Brooklands Gazette April 1925) provides us with a bookie’s observations:


‘The volume of business in comparison with the horse race meetings is very small indeed, and it would not be an exaggeration to say that any of the leading bookmakers in the Silver Ring at Kempton or Hurst Park would take more over one race than all the bookmakers at Brooklands would take over one event there. It must not be forgotten that there is no outside or SP money for motor racing, and the size of the bet, as a general rule, is very small indeed. The biggest ones I have laid at Brooklands that I recollect have been £150 to £50 against Chassagne when he was favourite for the 200 Miles Race, an even £100 against the Salmsons and Mr Coatalen had usually backed a Sunbeam team to win him a £100 in the 200 Mile Race.’


38


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