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because the B190 accelerates so quickly it has the effect of tightening the wheel-nuts provided the thread is in the right direction. On today’s F1 cars the braking forces are greater than the accelera- tion forces so the nuts are threaded in the opposite direction! In some ways though, F1 technology of over a quarter of a century ago can still astonish. The rear of the car, including the engine, gearbox, wing and suspension, is attached to the front tub by just three titanium plates that are approximately six by two inches. Anyone who took the opportunity after the talk to hold a sam- ple plate would attest to its incredible lightness. The latter part of the evening’s presentation was taken up with short films of John driving the car. One interesting run was round the car park at Cosworth’s facility in Northampton. Few of the staff had seen an HB engine which was manufac- tured in that factory. The most memorable trip was in 2015 to Suzuka, the B190 returning to where it secured that not-so-famous victory. In front of a crowd of 35,000 it participated in a demonstration race with two other Benettons, Gerhard Berger’s 1986 Ferrari and a Toleman. It only takes two people to help John to run the


BOOK REVIEW


The plate on the car – the shiny piece top right with a pipe running down beside it (Gareth Tarr).


Benetton B190 but more modern F1 cars require a much larger team. And that means that this is as ‘modern’ an F1 car that an individual can realistically own and run. As John demonstrated, if one has the resources, it is a very rewarding experience.


Gareth Tarr News


Two Wheels to War by Martin and Nick Shelley,


ISBN 978-1-911096-58-0, hardback, published by Helion & Co £25


t is now 100 years since the First World War was at its height with many events being high- lighted and the anniversary of its end still over a year away. There were many new developments in warfare of which the introduction of the tank was one of the more memorable. Almost unno- ticed was the creation of the motorcycle dispatch rider, or ‘DonR’. The army manoeuvres in 1913 had revealed how useful motorcycles could be but nothing more was done. When war was declared in August 1914 the first Division to go into action rapidly recruited ‘experienced’ motorcyclists to fill this role. Included in the first dozen to volunteer were two riders with Brooklands connections – Cecil and Alick Burney. Geoffrey de Haviland had earlier created a motorcycle engine but when he concentrated on aviation, the Burney brothers purchased his drawings and spare castings for £5! By 1913 they had developed the engine into 350cc and 500cc machines which they


I 23


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