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MG DAY


News


MGCs surround a giant MG logo in the Paddock, including the car of the show (with bonnet open) (Tim Morris).


beautiful spring day ensured a good turnout for Brooklands’ MG Day on the first Sunday in April. From the earliest ‘flat-nose’ to the latest GS SUV, there were representative models from the marque’s 90 years of history. That flat-nose was a reminder of MG’s origins,


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the very first cars being Morris Oxfords with special Super Sports bodies by Morris Garages. Indeed on MG Day there was a Morris Cowley from the same period to illustrate the similarities. The MG name was fully adopted in 1927. It wasn’t long before MG was producing the iconic sports cars of the between-the-wars period and many examples were at Brooklands, which was especially appropriate bearing in mind that many raced at the circuit in the lead up to World War II. Midget, Magna, TA, J-type and others were amongst a myriad of MG variations of that period. Of note was a K3, surely that most exotic of MGs, and a 1938 VA registered to the East Sussex Constabulary. The latter had a special modification, a 'Thirtilite' warning light on the


Aerial view of the Paddock display (Roddy Garnett).


dashboard which came on between 20 and 30mph so the police could assess who was speed- ing. One wonders if those who fell foul of the ‘Thirtilite’ were greeted with, “Who do you think you are, Malcolm Campbell?” Post World War II saw the boom in sports car exports to the USA with MG very popular with those on the other side of the pond. Amongst the many MGAs, Bs and Midgets the eagle-eyed might have spotted at least four of the rare YT models. Strictly speaking these tourer versions of the YA saloon were never sold in the UK and indeed fewer than 1,000 were manufactured in total, so they are a rare sight in the UK. The Y-types celebrated 70 years since their first production at Brooklands with a fine display of over 20 cars in the Campbell Car Park. The ubiquitous MGB spawned some more high


powered variants by putting a three-litre straight- six and the Rover V8 engines under the bonnet. The former was known as the MGC and was launched in 1967. It was this year’s featured


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