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There are 168 hot and cold mineral spring pools which feature natural volcanic waters (left); the springs are themed around fi ve continents including America with is Amazonian Mayan architecture (top left) and Asia and with Cambodia’s Angkor Watt temple complex (top right)


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ission Hills Haikou in south China has 10 golf courses and is part of the largest golf club facility in the world.


Tiger Woods competes there, it hosted the 2014 World Ladies Championship and stars like Matthew McConaughey and footballer Ronaldo stay to play in celebrity matches. If golf’s not your thing, chances are


you haven’t heard of it, yet Mission Hills Haikou also boasts one of the world’s largest spa and mineral springs. With 168 natural, mineral pools and a staggering 90 treatment rooms, including 29 in-villa spa treatment suites, the 88,000sq m (947,222sq ft) wellness component is quite astonishing. Despite the challenges of operating something so big, the spa team delivers a personable experience and also reports healthy profi ts. So how does it do it?


TEEING OFF The Mission Hills Group is a family-owned hospitality business with three integrated leisure and wellness resorts in China. Each of its developments in Shenzen, Dongguan


and Haikou share the same model; a fi ve-star resort, a spa, a number of golf courses and high-end luxury housing. Originally from Hong Kong,


the Chu family that owns the Mission Hills Group made its money in the paper carton business, before investing in golf courses in Shenzen and Dongguan in 1992, which they developed into leisure destination resorts. In 2008, they bought cheap volcanic land in Haikou on the southern Chinese island of Hainan to create a resort. Two things happened next which turned Mission Hills Haikou from another golf leisure property, into a behemoth world-class wellness facility unlike anything else in China. Firstly, surveyors discovered previously


undetected volcanic mineral springs 800m below ground. The Beijing Health Lab tested the water and declared its high quality of minerals excellent for bathing. At this point, Mission Hills Group decided to make the volcanic springs a major feature of the resort.


Spa Business 3 2014 ©Cybertrek 2014 Read Spa Business online spabusiness.com / digital


Peggy Liong, group executive director


At the same time, the chair-


man of the company became ill and he grew increasingly interested in alternative ways to combat his bad health. He became great champion of the wellness component of Haikou and embraced the ambitious plans of Peggy Liong, the group executive director for all three


Mission Hills properties, to develop the volcanic springs into its own attraction. Tragically, the chairman passed away before the property was complete but his son has taken over and remains equally committed to off ering world-class wellness facilities at the heart of the resort.


STAND-OUT SPA DESIGN Aside from the top notch golf facilities, Mission Hills Haikou has a 539-bed hotel on-site. Included in the guestrooms are 28 spa villas and one four-bedroom spa mansion complete with its own treatment room and spa butler service. Next door to the hotel in its own


building, is the 24,000sq m (258,334sq ft) 93


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