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MARKETING


There are over 20 professional skincare brands on QVC including ESPA, Décleor, Murad, Elemis (left) and Gatineau (right)


SCREEN STAR Global TV shopping channel QVC is proving an effective way


for professional product houses to boost revenue and increase footfall in spas. Katie Barnes takes a look behind the scenes


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elling professional products outside of a spa – whether in a department store, online or via the TV – has traditionally been frowned on. It’s believed that


customers don’t get the necessary advice about the higher grade skincare and that retail is being taken away from operators. However, brands which have made the


leap into the world of TV shopping would argue otherwise. In an hour’s slot, qualified therapists educate viewers about products and give treatment advice and guidance, with techniques demonstrated on a model. Customers can even call in with queries to be answered live on air. Shopping channels can give a product


brand exposure to a new audience – QVC is broadcast in six countries and 296 million homes – and can increase spa footfall by up to 20 per cent. Today there are over 20 professional brands on QVC including ESPA, Murad, Decléor, Jurlique, Perricone, Elemis, L’Occitane and Gatineau. These companies are realising that


consumers need to trust the brands they purchase, particularly products that are put on the face. Confidence is built through raising awareness and giving exposure via multiple platforms.


ABOUT QVC QVC, a subsidiary of US media conglomer- ate Liberty Interactive, launched in North America in 1986 and expanded to the UK seven years later. Today shows are also aired in Germany, Italy, Japan and China, while France and is next on the list. Each country is run as a separate entity,


but in total QVC broadcasts to 296 million homes worldwide. Traditionally, purchases have been made via calls, but items can now also be bought via its website and smartphone apps and it has a presence on numerous social media platforms. In 2013, worldwide revenue stood at US$8.6bn (€6.3bn, £5bn), up 1 per cent from the previous year, and US$2.8bn (€2bn, £1.6bn) of that revenue came from its combined international territories. Demographics of viewers are hard to


pin down says Sarah Adam, a skincare buyer at QVC UK, but “they’re a really savvy bunch, because QVC educates them about the products.” She says they often ask “questions you need a therapist to answer” because they have sophisticated skincare routines, using a mix of separate cleansers, toners, serums, moisturisers and boosters for day and night, rather than just one or two products.


A brand will have around five to seven


live shows a month (plus pre-recorded sessions) and these are scheduled for different days of the week at various times to ensure they’re connecting with a cross section of people. According to Adam: “There’s absolutely no science behind who watches what and when. Pay day [at the end of the month] doesn’t make a differ- ence and we’re just as busy in January as we are at Christmas. It also depends what else is on TV – in the past, beauty brands have been up against Andy Murray’s final at Wimbledon and the birth of the royal baby. Having a compelling product is what makes the biggest difference.” A live show comprises 57 selling


minutes where a brand will feature three main, 20-minute offers. This fits in with typical viewing patterns, as people tend to switch channels on the hour and at 15-minute intervals. The star of a show will be Today’s Special


Value (TSV) – a product or collection that’s been created for QVC and sold at a very low price for one day. The TSV will still be sold after launch but at a higher price. Brands usually launch three to five TSVs a year. l Read on to find out how three leading spa product suppliers are using QVC.


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