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OFFSHORE TRAINING SAFETY


FEATURE SPONSOR


LOCATION


COMES FIRST FOR OFFSHORE WIND


22 years on from the installation of the first offshore wind farm in Denmark (Vindeby), and the Offshore Wind sector is still growing at a rapid rate.


Today 4,620 MW of offshore wind power is installed across the globe, with a massive 3,321 MW here in the UK, making us the current world leader in offshore power generation. But with this title comes responsibilities, with safety standards at the forefront.


WORKFORCE SAFETY PARAMOUNT


With Round 3 released in 2010, the biggest so far, construction is set to begin in 2014 with a huge 31 GW already leased to developers. This enormous surge in offshore wind projects will make the safeguarding of the sector’s workforce more important than ever.


One company working to meet this challenge is South Wales based safety training provider Safety Technology. Having recently joined forces with South Tyneside College’s Marine Safety Training Centre (MSTC), safety specialist Safety Technology has expanded their training capabilities to the North East of England.


PARTNERSHIP


Managing Director of Safety Technology, Bob Dickens said of their new offshore training capabilities “We are very pleased to have formed this partnership with the College to establish such world class facilities in the North East. The location and timing is very important to us given the planned future development in the region and the opportunity to service the huge growth in Offshore Renewable Energy, the Government Catapult programme, and the potential for job creation in the supply chain.”


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With the hostile conditions of working offshore, it is vital that wind farm personnel are given an insight into the environment they will be working in before they step off the vessel for the first time. With this in mind Safety Technology have installed a new training tower, built to meet the RenewableUK standards, on site at the Marine Safety Training Centre (MSTC), along with hub rescue, mock nacelle and fire units. Within these facilities trainees will be able to encounter real life wind turbine rescue and evacuation scenarios, as well as experiencing the harsh and turbulent conditions of working offshore in the MSTC’s 4 metre deep environmental pool.


ADAPTING TO FUTURE DEMAND


The UK’s offshore wind sector is on an upward climb with a further 18GW to be installed by 2020, by which point it will supply around 20 per cent of the UK’s electricity each year.


With no signs of slowing down it is important that training providers continue to develop and adapt their training to meet the unique safety needs of working offshore.


Katie Dawes Safety Technology


www.safetytechnology.co.uk


By placing their facilities in the hub of offshore wind activity, the company is now equipped to deliver the most industry specific offshore safety training programmes to surrounding wind farm owners and operators.


With giant offshore Round 3 projects such as the London Array (630 MW) and Dogger Bank (9000 MW) well underway, this expansion couldn’t have come at a better time with the workforce of the sector now recorded at 4,000 full time employees.


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