This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
LUBRICANTS


FEATURE SPONSOR


OIL CONDITION MONITORING NETWORK FOR WINDFARMS


We continue our regular lubricants feature with a look at condition monitoring on gearboxes and start the feature with more sound expert advice from our sponsor Hydac.


Whether a wind turbine is newly installed or reaching the end of its warranty period, oil condition monitoring on the gearboxes can prove to be a beneficial cost-saving tool for the turbine owners and manufacturers, providing predictions and early warnings prior to possible gearbox failures.


Working with owners and manufacturers, Hydac can help to design and supply a stand-alone condition monitoring network for the wind farm. The company has developed a turnkey solution that includes data acquisition and data transfer units.


CHALLENGES


One of the challenges faced was the lack of Ethernet infrastructure on the majority of wind farms, which hinders the handling and collection of data. It required a solution that allowed remote access to each individual turbine, to do away with the expense of having two engineers climb the turbine to download the data locally.


One example where the company has been proactive in addressing this issue is in partnership with Phoenix Contact. The solution implemented was based on a router using mobile technology. Using a 3G router, Hydac


achieved a high speed remote link to the master wind turbine.


PROACTIVE


This allows data to be pulled from the condition monitoring unit and to analyse the data remotely at their base in Witney. The premise behind this technology was to enable them to monitor the integrity of the wind turbine gearbox remotely, and therefore warn the customer of any early signs of failure. This whole concept is designed to be proactive rather than reactive.


Once a VPN secure link to the master wind turbine had been established, the next challenge facing the company was accessing data from the CMU data loggers installed in all eighteen wind turbines. Having decided to use just one 3G router to feed the data back to the master turbine, to reduce data costs, the best solution was to use a Wireless LAN Access Point. This was wirelessly linked to the other wind turbines using Wireless LAN Clients, as a result, both data and cabling costs were significantly reduced.


Remote access and remote monitoring of data are handled in a secure way, eliminating downtime and increasing efficiency and productivity. Service contracts are now available and can be tailored to customer’s requirements.


WATER


The Aqua Sensor AS 1000 is designed for online detection of water saturation in oils. It measures the water content relative to the saturation concentration (saturation point) and relays this as a 4 ... 20 mA signal. In addition the AS 1000 measures the temperature of the fluid and also provides this as a 4 ... 20 mA output signal. The AS 1000 therefore enables hydraulic and lubrication oils to be monitored accurately, continuously and online.


34 www.windenergynetwork.co.uk DATA SECURITY


However, a concern was raised regarding security of the data being transmitted to the company’s UK premises; this was resolved by transmitting solely via a secure VPN (Virtual Private Network) tunnel. An mGuard security router was installed at the premises to guarantee a secure connection to the 3G router at the wind farm.


SENSORS


The package of sensors selected for this application was crucial.


PARTICLES


The MCS 1000, certified by Germanischer Lloyd, monitors metallic particle contamination in lubrication fluids. The particles are detected by inductive measurement in which a coil system is the core element of the sensor. It detects metallic particles (ferromagnetic and non- ferromagnetic) > 100 μm in size. The MCS 1000 continuously monitors the condition of the system and provides information on any early-stage damage. The sensor is therefore a reliable tool for condition- based maintenance.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116