This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
FEATURE SPONSOR


OFFSHORE TRAINING PROVING ITS WORTH


This training has proven its worth on several occasions by identifying individuals that require additional coaching or mentoring in order to be considered suitable to be the second person in a two person team. This additional training obviously has commercial implications to an operational wind farm, but this customer considers it a sound investment.


ADDITIONAL TRAINING


Access and the performance of tasks in areas outside those defined in the objectives of the basic training are covered by additional training courses. These areas can include; spinners, hubs, blade roots, designated areas of nacelles, access to tower cabling between platforms, tower bases and blades.


Outside of some manufactures training, there is presently no national or global standard for advanced training. Any access and rescue training beyond the basic requirements needs to be comprehensive and relevant to the tasks undertaken, working environment and equipment used. For this reason it makes sense for the training to be as bespoke and practical as possible. There is little value in practicing rescue techniques from a Nordex N90 turbine hub if your duties are restricted to Siemens 2.3 Mw turbines.


This is most apparent in rescue and evacuation procedures as, we hope, these techniques are very infrequently utilised outside of the training environment.


Training providers will always strongly recommend that these techniques are regularly practiced to maintain an acceptable level of competence. Some companies formalise these practice sessions and appoint/train in-house demonstrators to plan, oversee and assess these sessions. Most approved training providers will also provide this service.


PROGRESS AND DEVELOPMENT As the wind energy industry progresses and develops, it is vital that the industry is served by trained, skilled, competent, safe people and that these high levels of attainment are regularly assessed and maintained.


Working at height is an integral part of the wind energy industry, and a part of the industry that is not without a potentially high degree of risk. With properly developed training programs developed with the input from organisations, manufactures, operators and accredited training providers, we can all play a part in the ongoing safety of our people.


Stephen Morris Training Manager Capital Safety


www.capitalsafety.eu Click to view more info REGULAR PRACTICE


Once learnt, knowledge and skill levels can quickly fade if not regularly practiced. For this reason the certification validity of working at height training in the wind energy industry is 2 years. It is recognised within the industry that especially for irregular climbers e.g. some management and support staff, skill levels can significantly diminish within the two year training certification period.


www.windenergynetwork.co.uk


87


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116