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JACK-UP VESSELS


MADE IN ABU DHABI! THE LATEST JACK-UP BARGE FOR


WORLDWIDE OPERATIONS


Abu Dhabi-based Gulf Marine Services (GMS), the largest provider of self-propelled self-elevating jack-up barges in the world, has announced it is building its third E-Class jack-up vessel GMS Enterprise. The company has a further option to build a fourth E-Class vessel as part of its continued global expansion.


DECEMBER 2013 LAUNCH


Like the majority of her nine sister vessels, GMS Enterprise will be constructed at the company’s quayside facility in Abu Dhabi and is scheduled to launch this December, ready for new contracts in 2014. With the exception of the steel requirement from China, the modified Gusto jack-up will be built in Abu Dhabi, with the detailed design, jacking system and outfitting completed by GMS’ skilled and experienced in-house team and a local labour force.


WHY ABU DHABI?


Duncan Anderson, Chief Executive Officer at GMS, says: “The fact that we can build our vessels here in Abu Dhabi is absolutely key as this allows us to produce these sophisticated niche assets at lower than market prices; at least 30% less than our competitors can achieve. The state-of-the-art design and operational efficiency of jackup barges like GMS Enterprise means we can also offer cost-effective solutions to our clients. This, along with our excellent safety record, is what defines GMS.”


FLEET EXPANSION During the past five years, the company has strategically expanded its fleet, offering adaptable multi-purpose jackup barges that can provide a range of offshore services in the oil, gas and renewable energy sectors world-wide, from well intervention to wind farm installation.


GROWTH FACILITY GMS, which has offices in Abu Dhabi,


FEATURE SPONSOR


Left to right: John Petticrew, Technical Director, Gulf Marine Services; Zong Xiaojian, Deputy General Manager, Sainty Marine Corporation Ltd.


Saudi Arabia, Nigeria and the UK, recently agreed a USD 360 million growth facility with Abu Dhabi Islamic Bank that will allow it to capitalise on the growing international need for its vessels. The company’s key areas of operations are in the Middle East, South East Asia, West Africa, the Mediterranean and the Southern North Sea, with current commitments worth around $460 million.


OPERATIONAL CAPABILITIES Mr Anderson adds: “Our E-Class vessels, Endeavour and Endurance (built in 2010) are technologically advanced and robust; they can withstand harsh weather environments and operate in deeper waters. GMS Enterprise will have further operational capabilities built into her design and will be an important addition to our fleet.”


SPECIFICATIONS


GMS Enterprise has four legs and provides a stable working platform with accommodation for up to 150 people; this can be increased depending on the contract and configuration. Deck machinery includes a 400 tonne main crane and a 60 tonne auxiliary hoist. The vessel also has a 22.2m diameter helideck which can accommodate an S-92 helicopter and can operate in a water depth of 85 metres and travel at eight knots.


ADVANTAGES


The vessel has clear advantages over conventional jackup barges (those with three legs and those which are not self- propelled). The jacking speed to move from one location to the next in-field is faster and safer with four legs as no ballast is required, and the weather window required for GMS to make the move is a few hours, compared to the average of three days.


The dynamic positioning (DP2) allows the vessel to move independently, with no need for anchor-handling or tug support, and ensures high accuracy positioning alongside platforms and pipelines.


Gulf Marine Services W.L.L www.gmsuae.com


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www.windenergynetwork.co.uk


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