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SUSTAINABILITY


The sports-themed project – designed by architects LAVA – will be based on sustainability and will include three towers of gold, silver and bronze


THE:SQUARE3 - SUSTAINABLE LIVING


gold, silver and bronze, is expected to open in Berlin in 2017. Located near the Olympic sports cen-


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tre and Europe’s largest urban nature reserve, The:Square3 urban quarter will offer sports-themed hotels, a medical and research centre, sports education facilities and sport-themed retail experi- ences all in one place. There will also be offices for sports companies and clubs, 1,000 apartments and a green piazza. Conceived by Berlin-based developer


Moritz Gruppg and designed by archi- tects LAVA, the 146,000sq m (1.5m sq ft)


Eco solutions include green ‘roof-scapes’


ew sport-inspired mixed-use de- velopment The:Square3, which will consist of three towers of


urban project is based on three themes: sport, life and nature. Sustainability is a key feature, the


building shapes will maximise daylight, reducing the need for artifical light and energy use, while naturally ventilated spaces throughout the complex will min- imise mechanical ventilation. Rainwater will also be collected and reused. Rising above a sport ‘podium’ will be the three towers of varying heights, with


Olympic themed facades. Each tower will be tapered towards the top to maximise sunlight, views and ventilation. The life aspect of the project will fo-


cus on the essentials for a high-quality and healthy urban existence. Mean- while, nature will be found throughout the development with green features in all three blocks. The apartments will have diagonally placed spaces, green roof-scapes with cascading balconies and integrated garden courtyards, and will overlook playing fields. Dirk Moritz, MD of Moritz Grouppe


said: “For us The:Square3 is more than just a development project, it’s a philoso- phy. Living in a big city is an experience – you can’t just order it online. “A good mix of people, culture and


lifestyles is what makes a city interesting and worth living in. Our goal is to answer the question: “How do we want to live in the future?”


today will use less electricity than the model you’re replacing. There are energy-efficient machines


MIELE - GREEN WASHING


times a day and for long periods of time. If your on-site washing machine or dryer is more than a decade old, it’s consuming a lot more electricity than it needs to. Today’s major appliances do not con-


S


sume electricity the way older models do. Miele Professional has put energy efficiency and minimising running costs at the heart of product development, which means any new appliance you buy


ports venues process a large amount of laundry and so laun- dry equipment is often used many


such as Miele’s heat-pump dryers that re- quire no ducting and easy to install. Miele’s heat-pump technology brings


drying times for a 10kg of laundry load down to only 44 minutes. This means that only 0.21kWh* is required per kg of laundry, equating to a reduction in energy consumption of 60 per cent, com- pared with a conventional Miele vented dryer with the same load capacity. Customers have reported that in 18


months they’ve already made savings and in five years, Miele predicts that heat pump dryers will completely take over from condenser dryers. * Basis of calculation: 100kg of laundry


per day, 250 days per year / Electricity costs: E0.19/kWh, reduction in residual moisture from 50 to 0 per cent.


Efficiency is at the heart of Miele’s products 62 Read Sports Management online sportsmanagement.co.uk/digital


sport-kit.net KEYWORD Miele


Issue 1 2013 © cybertrek 2013


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