This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
OUTREACH PROGRAMMES COMMUNITY MATTERS Football clubs are developing community outreach programmes that address social


issues and build greater affinity with local people. Neena Dhillon looks at three clubs promoting health in pioneering ways, and setting an inspiring example to us all


The Movement is Derby County’s flagship project, addressing the high level of inactivity among teenage girls


strides to further meaningful commu- nity engagement. This has involved football clubs positioning themselves at the heart of their respective com- munities by delivering programmes that seek to improve the wellbeing of people in their local areas. No longer is this work confined to a coach or player being sent to a school with a bag of footballs; today’s schemes are diverse in their reach and target schoolchildren as well as vulnerable people of all ages, backgrounds and abilities. The more advanced community mod-


O


els are based on a not-for-profit trust or foundation that reports into the par- ent football club, while maintaining its structural and financial independence. Although it will be expected to raise finance through core activity strands such as weekend and holiday football clubs and fitness facilities, trusts typically receive crucial ‘in-kind’ support including PR, HR, IT, legal and adminis- trative resources. External bodies and


corporate sponsors are major sources of fund- ing, and it’s becoming increasingly common for multi-dimensional


ver the past five years the UK’s football industry, backed by its major league and player associations, has taken great


partnerships to be fostered with or- ganisations such as primary healthcare trusts, the police, local authorities, Na- tional Lottery and Comic Relief. Football associations and governing bodies in- cluding the Premier League, FA and PFA also play a significant financial role; the Premier League, for example, invested £45m in 2011 to benefit projects that focused on sports participation, health, education or community cohesion.


DERBY COUNTY IN THE COMMUNITY (DCITC) Derby County Football Club’s award- winning community programme, which achieved charitable trust status in 2008, currently engages over 20,000 adults and children annually, under- pinned by funding of £1.3m that has been secured over the past three years from partner organisations. With this financing, DCITC runs football and other


physical activity clubs, educational and enterprise initiatives, social inclusion programmes and mental health schemes to engage a wide range of groups. Of particular note is The Movement,


a flagship project set up by DCITC and Derby City Council in 2008 to address high levels of inactivity among teen- age girls aged 11 to 16 years. Supported by the Premier League and PFA, The Movement has provided 3,000 local girls with affordable dance, gym, swim and workout sessions in schools, village clubs and council-run leisure centres as well as self-esteem courses, a Movement maga- zine and interactive website providing advice on healthy lifestyles and access to a course offering a professional insight into multi-media careers. DCITC head of community Simon


Derby County’s community programme currently engages over 20,000 local people 24 Read Sports Management online sportsmanagement.co.uk/digital


Carnall explains how the initiative has broken down barriers: “Cost, logistics, self-esteem and body image were some of the factors stopping these young people from being active, so we provided safe, local and girls-only environments where they could exer- cise at affordable rates [£1–1.75 per class]. We focused on the activities they were interested in – such as dance, beauty and the media – rather than football. We gave them a membership card offering incentives to


Issue 1 2013 © cybertrek 2013


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84