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RESEARCH


WE'VE ALL GOT TO OWN THIS AND NOT ASSUME THAT OBESITY IS SOMEONE ELSE'S PROBLEM. IT'S NOT JUST FOR DOCTORS TO SORT OUT


Kelly welcomes, and it’s a rapproche- ment that he sees as vital to the future. “There are a number of medical, sport


and fitness leaders around the country who are working tirelessly to make this happen, and I’m optimistic that we’re moving in the right direction,” he says. “It’s very likely that in the next five to


10 years we’ll see more of this work in- corporated into the medical curriculum and the training of GPs.” Many experts have drawn a paral-


lel between the detrimental effects of smoking and the dangers of a seden- tary lifestyle. After the publication of the Doll and Hill study into the link be- tween smoking and lung cancer in the early 1950s, Kelly says that most doctors changed their own smoking habits. “Even today it’s still very rare to see a


doctor, in the UK at least, who is a smok- er. They’ve been fantastic role models for us all. GPs have been one of the major ways we’ve achieved success in the ces- sation of smoking. It leads us to assume that if they can become as single-minded in their recommendation of physical ac- tivity, they could play a very important part in the process.”


CARROTS AND STICKS An added complication with treating the so-called lifestyle diseases is that they


ABOUT PROFESSOR MIKE KELLY


Professor Kelly is director of the Centre of Public Health Excellence at NICE where he leads on the development of public health guidance. He is a public health practitioner, researcher and academic. He studied social science at the University of York, has a Masters degree in sociology from the University of Leicester,


and undertook his PhD in the Department of Psychiatry in the University of Dundee. His interests include evidence-based


approaches to health improvement, coronary heart disease prevention, chronic illness, disability, physical activity, health inequalities, behaviour change, social identity and community involvement in health promotion.


50 Read Sports Management online sportsmanagement.co.uk/digital NICE recommends that people walk and cycle more


involve tackling the complex issue of hu- man behaviour. To this end, Kelly says NICE is currently updating its 2007 guide- lines on behaviour change.“It’s one thing to resolve to change your behaviour and quite another to have continuing benefi- cial behaviour,” he says. Returning to the issue of smoking, Kelly says that across the decades there


have been some very effective public education campaigns, a gradual “de- normalising” of the act of smoking, increasingly hard-hitting advertising, the banning of adverts on cigarette packets and ultimately the ban on smoking in public places. “All of these things have led to a


remarkable improvement in people’s health with regards to heart disease, cancer and chest illnesses,” he says. However, these changes took 60


years, and Kelly acknowledges that with the obesity and lifestyle disease


‘time-bomb’ we cannot afford to spend quite as long forming a solution. Kelly admits it may take a while for


some GPs and other health professionals to embrace the message of physical activ- ity, but he remains positive. “The decisive change hasn’t happened


yet – it’s been a rather slow burn, but I’m optimistic that we’re talking about the medicine of the future.” ●


Issue 1 2013 © cybertrek 2013


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