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Crowds line the streets of London to welcome the 2012 British Olympic team on their victory parade on 10 September, 2012


new English Baccalaureat for sidelining PE, like the arts, as a non-core subject. 3. For those with learning difficulties Many people with learning difficulties are excellent athletes, as the Special Olympics show. HMG should consider pressing the International Paralympic Committee to take in this large group who are under-recognised and under provided for across the world. 4. For those with disabilities After an even more successful Paralympics than expected, with 120 medals and 2.7m ticket sales covering the £45m running costs and such enthusiasm that in closing the Games, Lord Coe said it had changed how we see disability, will the legacy be sustained? Despite a modest £2m contribution


from the Legacy Fund, we are now left with the coalition’s proposed cuts in Disability Allowances, the banning of dis- abled people by some commercial fitness


centres and the ignorance of sports clubs which declare no discrimination, but whose physical resources, knowledge and attitudes have never been tested by a disabled person’s application.


The Select Committee on Science and


Technology: “We find it remarkable that DCMS isn’t concerned with the health benefits of sport.”


5. Doctors and medics Many GPs do not know about the latest physical activity guidelines, so the med- ical profession needs to improve initial and in-service training for GPs. 6. The proposed National Centre for Sport and Exercise Medicine


PARTICIPATION IN FOREST RECREATION


Forest recreation has often been neglected in the total span of countryside visiting. When the Countryside Commission oversaw rural recreation, visits to forests were distinguished in its surveys, but now Natural England has the job, its annual Monitoring Engage- ment with the Natural Environment survey doesn’t distinguish forest vis- itors to either public or private sites,


Forest recreation has been often neglected


but loses them among countryside visitors in general. This leaves smaller, sporadic surveys by Forest Research in England, Wales and Scotland separately and this is unhelpful in the light of gov- ernment u-turns and accepting that the public forest estate should not be sold, but retained and better managed. This change followed 40,000 public replies and opposition from the National Trust and the Ramblers’ Association.


This is to be established in the Olym- pic Park, but only the initial capital has been found, and the research councils are saying it will have to compete with long-established biomedical centres for revenue; this is giving a legacy with one hand and taking it with the other. The centre needs an initial endow-


ment of staff and equipment from government and the research councils if it is to help elite athletes before the Rio Games and the general population in the foreseeable future. 7. Joined up government First, the recent Select Committee on Sci- ence and Technology commented dryly “we find it quite remarkable that DCMS is not concerned with the health ben- efits of sport”: Minister Hugh Robertson had said DCMS is “not concerned with the bigger drive on the nation’s health”. This is purblind so far as the 2012


legacy is concerned, and ignores the experience of Finland, the country his


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