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PEACE & SPORT


as all peace-building initiatives between Palestinians and Israelis in Gaza were banned in 2010. Surfers in Israel have a much better


deal than in Gaza. Whereas Gaza has ac- cess to less than 30 boards, in Israel the surf scene is mature with about 20,000 surfers, including many females. The main aim of S4P is simply to pro-


mote friendship. “Opposite to what it looks like in the media, many of us want to find ways to co-exist,” says Rashko- van. “We want to get people in the water, show them the Aloha spirit and let them enjoy a pure feeling of free- dom. Surfing can bring people from different backgrounds together. We try not to deal with politics, but keep it at a roots level and talk only with surfers.” Going forward, Explore Corps has


been asked to establish the first Palestinian Surfing Association, which would be the Palestinian representative of the International Surfing Association, – which governs international competi- tive surfing. • www.gazasurfclub.comm.olsen@explorecorps.comwww.surfing4peace.orgart.rashkovan@gmail.com


SWAPPING SPEARS FOR BATS South African cricket fanatic Aliya Bauer had the idea of introducing cricket to school children in the Laikipia area of Kenya, Africa, when she was working on a primate conservation project which in- volved going into schools. “The children were used to being lec-


tured to and were not very responsive to questions asked. I desperately wanted the children to open up and share their thoughts, so I thought of a different way to engage with them. I brought some mini-cricket equipment and introduced it


46 Read Sports Management online sportsmanagement.co.uk/digital In Kenya, playing cricket has united rival communities who previously raided each other's cattle A number of adventurous organisations are braving


war zones and volatile areas around the world to take sporting opportunities to the people living there


in a primary school,” Bauer explains. That was in 2007. Now cricket is being played in 24 schools, three youth cricket clubs and three children’s homes. Added to this, there are 105 trained coaches. Maasai morans (warriors) saw the chil-


dren playing cricket and were keen to have a go; the bowling action was similar to spear throwing and the thrill of hitting the ball appealed to their competitive nature. Soon there were enough morans to


make up a team, although there were no other teams to play against, as cricket was unknown in the region. Cricket has united rival communities


who previously raided each others’ cattle. “Cricket allows them to be competitive without being adversarial, allowing them to see beyond their differences,” says Bauer. The Massai Cricket Warriors have surrendered their weapons and are cam- paigning against traditional practices such as polygamy, female genital mutilation and early childhood marriages. Bauer has noted it has empowered the school girls,


who were initially very shy but now tussle over the bat. One of the greatest challenges is the


lack of proper facilities and a shortage of adequate equipment, which is imped- ing the growth. Also, many warriors don’t own shoes, which presents a safety risk. Bauer is also disappointed that Cricket


Kenya is yet to support the cricket devel- opment and is hoping to win its attention. Funding is a challenge, with most to date coming from individual donors rather than a long-term donor. “I hope that we will be able to secure funding and support for the Maasai Cricket Warriors to allow them to become full-time cricket coaches and players within their communities, and to see a Maasai Cricket Warrior opening the bowling attack for Kenya,” she says. Bauer also hopes to take a team to the UK to compete in the Last Man Stands World Championships, following their success in last year’s tournament in South Africa. ● • www.massaicricketwarriors.commaasaicricketwarriors@gmail.com


FROM THE SPORTS MANAGEMENT HANDBOOK 2013


Click here to read the online edition or visit www.sportsmanagementhandbook.com/digital


Issue 1 2013 © cybertrek 2013


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