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PROFILE


been working on it for a long time, explains Morton. “Around three years ago, we sat down with various national governing bodies and asked them which events they’d like to host. They gave us more than 200 nominations – we prior- itised those, and developed a target list of 70 events.” Sixteen of these events have already


been won, including the flagship 2017 World Athletics Championships – “the biggest event the UK has never host- ed,” as Morton puts it – which will take place in the Olympic Stadium. Morton describes winning this event as one of the highlights of his career with UK Sport. Other flagship events secured since the start of the process include the 2015 World Artistic Gymnastics Champi- onships, the 2015 World Canoe Slalom Championships and the World Triathlon Championships Series Final 2013. “We have also launched bids for the 2016 Eu- ropean Swimming Championships and


the 2016 Track Cycling World Champion- ships,” adds Morton. Although the campaign has now had


major successes, things didn’t look quite so rosy a year or two ago. “At the start of our new bid cycle,


around 12 to 18 months ago, we bid for a Hockey World Cup to be hosted in London in 2014, and for a World Netball Championships to take place in Man- chester in 2015,” says Morton. “Those were the first big world events that we bid for under the new programme, and we lost both of the bids.” If securing the 2017 World Athletics


Championships was a highlight for Mor- ton, this period was a bit of a low point. “That was a challenging time, because


the pressure starts to grow when you lose a few bids,” he says. “People start to question whether you’ve got the right approach, whether the UK will be a strong hosting nation post-Games. Happily, since then we’ve only lost one


big event, which was the World Rowing Championships 2015.” The hosting of major sporting events


is part of the government’s long-term sporting strategy, which aims to use the success of London 2012 to attract events that will bring both economic and sport- ing benefits to the UK. But while the economic benefits of


hosting prestigious sporting events are important, Morton is also keen to stress the intangible benefits. “As well as the tangible benefits,


around things like economic impacts and a boost to visitor numbers and the promotion of the country, there are the inspirational benefits of these events, pumping interested and driven people towards some of the other structures which organisations like the govern- ing bodies and Sport England offer,” he says. “We saw in 2012 how sporting events can create these really unique moments of communal celebration.


THE GOLD EVENT SERIES EVENTS WON SO FAR


■ Track Cycling World Cup 2012 ■ Gymnastics World Cup 2012 ■ European Athletics Team Championship 2013


The Lee Valley White Water Centre will host the 2015 Championships


■ BMX Supercross World Cup 2013 ■ Rowing World Cup 2013 ■ World Youth Netball Championships 2013 ■ Rugby League World Cup 2013 ■ World Triathlon Championships Series Final 2013


40 Read Sports Management online sportsmanagement.co.uk/digital


■ Squash Men’s World Open Championships 2013


■ Wheelchair Tennis Singles Masters 2014 ■ IPC European Swimming Championships 2015


■ European Eventing Championships 2015 ■ EuroHockey Championships 2015 ■ World Canoe Slalom Championships 2015 ■ World Artistic Gymnastics 2015 ■ World Athletics Championships 2017


Issue 1 2013 © cybertrek 2013


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