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ARCHITECT FOCUS


Fusion Lifestyle has been appointed


to manage the centre; the company is paying rent to the City of London Cor- poration, so it’s getting income back in return for the capital that’s been spent. More importantly though, the residents of the Golden Lane Estate have got a fantastic new sports facility.


What is your favourite part of the refurbished centre? I think it’s the way we’ve exposed and treated the existing pavement lights, and used them to let daylight in. They have enabled us to transform the vault- ed areas of the building that weren’t well used before. The new gym has been put into the vaulted club rooms, and it’s a fantastic space now.


How was sustainability taken into account? Introducing double glazing has dramat- ically reduced heat loss, and we’ve put in a lot of low energy lighting. We’ve also got photovoltaic panels generating electricity on the roof, which introduces quite a strong renewable energy com- ponent to the building.


GOLDEN LANE LEISURE CENTRE


The Golden Lane Leisure Centre is located at the heart of the Golden Lane Housing Estate, and was originally designed by Chamberlin, Powell and Bon (the practice responsible for the Barbican and the Golden Lane Estate) in 1963. The centre takes an ‘L’ shaped form around a quadrangle and is the conglomeration of two formerly separated buildings; the two storey swimming pool and badminton court and the single storey club rooms.


The centre is a Grade II listed building


and is owned by the City of London Corporation. It reopened in January 2012 after a year-long refurbishment by Cartwright Pickard. The contractor for the works was Quinn London, and Fusion Lifestyle is managing the centre. The leisure centre has a 20m pool, sports hall, 38-station gym, dance studio and outdoor courts for tennis, netball and children’s five-a-side football.


What were the biggest challenges of this project? Working with a listed building. It’s not like just getting planning permission, you have to get listed building consent and you have to go through a much higher level of scrutiny and approvals to get that consent. There’s probably 50 per cent more


work involved in a listed building proj- ect than a non-listed one. You do these projects partly because they are quite high profile, and partly because it’s in


the interest of the practice to experi- ence working on different building types. If I was doing this job purely for money, I would have turned this project away, but we enjoy having a variety of work in the office and it’s an honour to be involved in the refurbishment of such an iconic project.


What reactions have you had? Extremely good. We had an open evening and the feedback was over- whelmingly positive. Everyone raved


n The floor to celing windows fill the space with natural light and open up the centre to passers by 32 Read Sports Management online sportsmanagement.co.uk/digital Issue 1 2013 © cybertrek 2013


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