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PHILIPS - LEAN LIGHTING L


ighting accounts for 19 per cent of the world’s electricity consumption. The financial and environmental


pressures facing sport clubs and facilities today can be eased by making informed choices about lighting requirements. Choices that not only result in energy, carbon and cost savings but also enhance the fan and player experience, with improved quality of light and even a re- duction in light pollution. The right lighting can unlock the po-


tential of a facility, increasing usage and driving revenue. Significant savings are possible by considering a few key factors such as Design Maintenance Factor (MF), Total Light Output Ratio (TLOR) and To- tal Cost of Ownership (TCO). Lighting typically consists of a light


source, luminaire (containing optical means) and control gear to power the light source. When looking for a new lighting system it’s essential to consider the TCO and not just the initial invest- ment. By carefully considering all aspects, the system will continue to provide ex- ceptional light throughout its life, on the condition that the system is maintained as recommended by the manufacturer,


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which should be accounted for in the de- sign stages. This is the amount that the light will depreciate in between mainte- nance activities such as lamp changes. It’s also important to consider the


TLOR of the luminaire, applicable to all light sources including LED. Light output will be lost through the optical system of the lighting unit, plus reflected light, because of its nature, can sometimes di- rect light outside the task area wasting light and energy. The light source inside the luminaire has a flux value expressed in lumens, with some having higher flux


certainly be additional energy losses within the control gear. This is more significant in the discharge lighting cur- rently used for sports pitches, therefore, when calculating the overall energy con- sumption this should include the total system’ Once you have this, the efficien- cy of each light can be calculated.


CASE STUDY - STREETLY Streetly Lawn Tennis Club replaced all its asymmetrical tungsten luminaires with more efficient double asymmetric metal halide types, where lighting is forced in a downward-only direction. The result was a 60 per cent reduc-


The result of changing


the lighting system was a 60 per cent reduction in costs and a 100 per cent increase of lighting levels


values than others. Once this is multi- plied by the TLOR of the luminaire, this can sometimes equal out. Good TLOR values can reach 0.85 for


recreational use and more for stadiums where consumption is a major factor. When looking into the total power con- sumption of a system, there will almost


tion in costs and a 100 per cent increase in lighting levels to meet LTA standards. Will Rogers, the club’s Director of Tennis says: “We’ve been delighted with help received from Philips Lighting in the design, sourcing and installation of our new floodlights. We looked at a number of systems and chose Philips’ 1000W OptiVision floodlight luminaires. “We’ve now reduced our electricity


usage and maintenance costs by over 60 per cent. Glare and spillage from the old tungsten halogen lights has been reduced and our members and visit- ing teams have been delighted with the greatly improved quality of the lighting.”


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