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PEACE & SPORT


Gaza Surf Club has developed a surfing


community where resources can be shared, a training forum and links to the international surfing community


students being killed. Also, 50 per cent of the students are street working children, who provide an income for their families through selling trinkets and chewing gum on the streets, so keeping up a good weekly attendance is a challenge. “For some families having their chil-


dren come to Skateistan instead of working is simply unrealistic financially,” says Percovich. “Although every day that the children attend the programme,


they gain valuable access to education and opportunities that can give them skills for the future, and are in a safe en- vironment rather than on the streets.” • http://skateistan.orginfo@skateistan.org


SURFING IN A WAR ZONE Living in Gaza is tough. The Israeli blockade and clampdown on exit per- mits restricts freedom and there are no parks, greens, forests or open spaces to escape to. So the sea offers a refuge. The son of a US diplomat, Matthew


Olsen, who grew up in Tel Aviv in Israel from the age of 13, set up the Gaza Surf Club in 2008, as a pilot project for his non-profit organisation, Explore Corps.


44 Read Sports Management online sportsmanagement.co.uk/digital


There are three aims to the organisa-


tion: developing a surfing community where resources and expertise can be shared; providing a forum for training and support; and linking Gaza surfers up with the international surfing community. “Surfers around the world are a kind


of tribe and being incorporated and having the Gaza surfers welcomed into this global community is a big part of what the mission of the surf club is about,” says Olsen. “Especially consid- ering how much Gaza has been cut off from the rest of the world in the past five years.” A couple of initiatives are currently underway: producing training videos


Issue 1 2013 © cybertrek 2013


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