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SPA EXPERIENCES


elements, such as mineral- and trace element-enriched baths, healing liquid applications, relaxation programmes, steam and aroma baths, light and sound therapy. The public sector must not make the mistake of providing uninspired community wellness facilities for the sake of it, but needs authentic and competitive concepts in order to be successful.” “Capital spend has to be controlled


and linked to the affordability identified in the business plan,” adds Watts. “In our experience, capital costs of over £1.2m may not be viable in terms of creating a sustainable bottom line.”


Pendle’s affordable Inside Spa has attracted a whole new demographic


Growing momentum Not everyone agrees with the current move towards public sector spas. “Most


council areas aren’t able to invest and maintain top-end facilities,” states Barr and Wray’s Lorne Kennedy. Competitor Dalesauna sees things differently however, with sales director Gerard McCarthy saying: “Public sector facilities are allowing people to embrace wellbeing activities as part of healthy lifestyles, not just guilty pleasures.” Certainly there are a number of


examples of successful public sector spa developments across the UK, from Glasgow and Pendle in the north to St Albans in the south. As demand and public opinion continues to evolve, perhaps the question isn’t if the UK public sector will catch up with the holistic health and wellbeing offer of its continental counterparts, but when. l


The Refresh Spa offers a high-end look


CASE STUDY 1


ENHANCING THE MEMBERSHIP


Refresh Spa at the Emirates Arena, Glasgow, UK


G


lasgow Life’s state of the art sports and leisure complex includes the operator’s first


major spa facility. There are four treatment rooms, dedicated manicure and pedicure area, caldarium, sauna, steamroom, sanarium (herbal aroma sauna) and vitality pool. A new membership has been introduced to allow existing Glasgow Club members to add the spa to their membership


for £25 a month, giving them access to the hydro and thermal areas. “As the Glasgow Club continues


to compete successfully with the private sector in the city, and grows its membership [see also p30], there is anecdotal evidence to suggest that this addition to the offer will enable a range of supplementary promotions, incentives and offers to give marketing, financial and staff motivation opportunities,” says Spa Developments Consultancy’s Colin Cameron, who works with Glasgow Life’s management team at the spa. The facilities at the Refresh Spa were


designed to compare directly to the top hotel spas in Scotland, while pricing was matched to high street spas and beauty salons. Research was conducted


42 Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital


to select facilities, treatments and products (provided by Elemis and Murad), in order to attract existing luxury spa customers who may be tightening their purses, as well as introducing a new market to the wellbeing benefits of a spa. “Ultimately it will be a combination


of the spa’s aesthetics and standards of service – in terms of staff knowledge and experience – that will play a very important role in attracting and retaining Glasgow Club members,” adds Cameron. “The range of services and treatments will enhance membership options, adding a new layer of service opportunities to increase usage levels, enhance activity and encourage loyalty.”


February 2013 © Cybertrek 2013


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