This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
how and when Women are less active than men overall, but there are big discrepancies between countries in terms of the number of women who are physically active. In some cultures, women are discouraged from exercising: in more conservative Islamic societies in the Middle East, for example, women showing skin in public is frowned upon, making public exercise diffi cult. Women in Saudi Arabia have actually had to fi ght for their right to exercise. Since 2009, there have been drives to close women’s gyms that are not felt to be suffi ciently overseen and monitored. But there are some positive signs. This


1


year, Saudi Arabia fi nally agreed to send two women to the Olympic Games. Brunei and Qatar still refuse to allow women to compete, but as Ahmed al- Marzooqi, editor-in-chief of Saudi-based sports newspaper shesport.com, explains, London 2012 “showed to all people and religious authorities in Saudi that women in sports do not clash with Islamic tradition and Saudi society”. Meanwhile in Singapore – a multi- ethnic country encompassing Chinese, Malays and Indians – community-based physical activity programmes have been customised for specifi c ethnic groups, in collaboration with mosques, Malay Muslim organisations and Indian temples. In the US, low-income Latinas are more likely to experience high rates of


Culture dictates the fundamental expectations as to who should be active,


EUROPE 34.8


AMERICAS 43.3


Physical inactivity* in adults Aged 15 years or more, latest available year (2009 or earlier), %


00.0


>50.0 40.0– 49.9 30.0–39.9 20.0–29.9 <19.9 no data By region


Source: The Lancet


AFRICA 27.5


THE


17.0


MIDDLE EAST


43.2


SOUTH-EAST ASIA


PACIFIC 33.7


ASIA-


WORLD: 31.1% *Physical activity is defi ned as 30 minutes of moderate-intensity


activity fi ve times a week, 20 minutes of vigorous-intensity activity three times a week, or some combination of both


Physical activity levels vary dramatically around the world, with the UK among the worst In Australia, women are actually


inactivity compared with other members of the population due to lack of access to exercise locations and lack of affordable Spanish language programmes. A study discovered that “culturally tailored aerobic exercise intervention” can be instrumental in encouraging this group to participate in vigorous exercise several times a week. In China, activity levels between


the sexes are much more equal, with communist ideologies supporting the equal participation of men and women.


more likely to participate in sport than men, as they have a greater reported commitment to keeping themselves healthy in the longer term. However, Aboriginal Australians face a number of challenges when it comes to exercise, not least that exercising can be seen as anti-social and against the principles of spending time with your family. There are also low levels of activity in


markets with rapidly ageing populations. Globally, people under the age of 35 were


In China, activity is encouraged among both sexes


Saudi Arabia: Women fi ght for exercise rights


TONYV3112 / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM


october 2012 © cybertrek 2012


Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital


67


ZURIJETA / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100