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IMTS PAVILION: METALCUTTING


that enables machining of complex components. In the field of additive manufacturing DMG MORI uses a blown powder deposition welding process with laser, as it has long been used in principle for repair work in the tool making or turbine technology branches. In this process the powder is melted onto the base material by the laser beam. DMG MORI also builds up layer by layer, but only uses the powder where it is actually needed. This reduces the necessary quantity of powder significantly.


Okuma Opens its Customers to Possibilities


Okuma America Corp. (Charlotte, NC) will exhibit 17 machines from its variety of high-tech and core product cat- egories. “If you take the time to count, the machines have a total of 72 axes,” said Tim Thiessen, vice president-sales. “Inside of the booth, we will detail how our customers can benefit from the Open Possibilities that our OSP control and broad product line offer. Our high-tech products include vertical and horizontal multitasking machining centers and five axis machining centers and vertical turning lathes.” Okuma will have demonstration parts in the booth for aerospace and medical applications. “If we’re making an aerospace part on a Multus, we’ll also feature an automo- tive or medical on a video screen being machined on the same machine,” said Thiessen. At IMTS, Okuma’s MU-5000V vertical machining center will be shown cutting an actuator and intake manifold on steel, aluminum and titanium. The MU-5000V is excel- lent for five-axis multisided machining. It features stan- dard ballscrew cooling and a highly rigid left-right, mobile trunnion table to support high-precision and heavy-duty cutting power in a compact footprint. Maximum productiv- ity is achieved with a wide array of automation options. The unique design places the pallet changes at the back of the machine, allowing easy connection to a Palletace flexible manufacturing system, pallet pool, large capacity ATC and robots to deliver high productivity in addition to high accuracy.


Simulators in the Okuma booth will demonstrate the intuitive nature of the OSP control. “We’ll also be showing our machine tool apps which can be made by the user, much like smart phone apps. We make a number of apps as do our distributors and customers. They are basically little applications that may address a certain need or desire to get certain information out of the control or create a special procedure like a lock-out procedure. We’ll also be


78 AdvancedManufacturing.org | August 2016


showing our OSP Suite, which may seem to be like an app, but they are kind of like widgets on the control, a calculator, a materials calculator, messaging, or an eco-friendly suite recognizes that certain motors and pumps can be turned off if not needed to save money or be more energy efficient for savings,” said Thiessen.


Three A’s Hold Sway at Methods Machine Tools According to Bryon Deysher, president and CEO, Meth- ods Machine Tools Inc. (Sudbury, MA) focuses its product development focus on the three A’s: Automation, Additive, and Accuracy. “With builder partners such as Nakamura- Tome, FANUC, Yasda, Kiwa, Feeler, and now 3D Systems, we are in a unique position to bring the latest technologies to both subtractive and additive solutions for our customers serving aerospace, defense, medical, firearms, and automo- tive industries.” To enable its customers to deal with the shortage of skilled labor in the manufacturing workforce, Methods Machine has expanded its Methods Automation group to provide customers with more unattended processes with Nakamura, FANUC Robodrill, FANUC EDM, and Feeler Prod- ucts. Nakamura, Yasda, and Kiwa offer built-in automation. “Additive manufacturing solutions in both metal and nonmetal composites from 3D Systems enable our cus- tomers to meet these demands of time-to-market pres- sure,” said Deysher. “We will feature the most advanced 3D additive manufacturing solution with the new ProX DMP 320 Metal Printer. Feeler will feature a variety of prismatic part and full five-axis solutions, and FANUC will introduce new models in high productivity solutions on both EDM and Robodrill platforms—all intended to meet critical time- to-market requirements. “Methods Machine’s expanded automation offerings will include FANUC robots providing automated deburring and inspection systems in addition to our normal machine tending solutions. We will also be displaying a high-speed gantry system on a Nakamura WT150 platform and a Kiwa KMH300 six-pallet system as solutions with built-in auto- mation,” said Deysher. “The Yasda PX30 will address both production high-accuracy requirements with positioning feedback resolution of 0.1 µm and untended capability with 33 pallets and full five-axis capability. We will also feature three Yasda Jig Borer class platforms for Die Mold and ultra- precision requirements.”


—Jim Lorincz


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