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INDUSTRIAL AUTOMATION NORTH AMERICA


[OT] systems as part of a smart manufacturing approach,” she noted. “But IT and OT systems have historically remained separate from each other in most plants. As a re- sult, the skill sets of IT and operations personnel have been limited to their individual areas of focus.”


The constantly changing risks in the automation landscape challenge users to manage security threats and achieve com- pliance with increasingly complex regulations, Roberts said. “Security needs to be a continuous, evolving component of a company’s overall safety strategy. This means proactive safety management beyond worker safety and into consumer safety.” Rockwell’s displays will illustrate the technology advances


required to address the convergence of IT and OT systems, Roberts said. “Accelerated by the emergence of the Industrial Internet of Things and advances in enabling technologies—in- cluding data analytics, remote monitoring and mobility—The Connected Enterprise opens new worlds of opportunity through greater connectivity and information sharing,” she said. —Patrick Waurzyniak


RFID Reader


The BIS M-4008 All-in-One RFID Reader features an integrated processor aimed at lean solutions with a need to detect data carriers on workpieces or workpiece carriers at individual stations. Typical applications include material fl ow control in production facilities, conveying systems and assembly lines. The 13.56-MHz reader has IP67 protection and a rugged die-cast zinc housing features a Profi net interface, needs no additional processor and can com- municate directly with the control level. The device is said to be the only all-in-one reader on the market with an integrated two-port Ethernet switch for constructing simple line and ring topologies. An


integrated Web server provides convenient status monitoring from a distance. Highly visible LEDs directly on the device also indicate status. The new reader supports data carriers conform- ing with RFID standard ISO 15693. Anyone needing faster data transmission can simply choose Balluff high-speed data carriers with a transmission rate of up to 8× faster than the standard and extra-large memory capacities of up to 128KB. Balluff Inc.


Ph: 859-727-2200 Web site: www.balluff.com


208 AdvancedManufacturing.org | August 2016


to the shop fl oor. Production can easily be monitored and data gathered during actual operation with capabilities to benchmark various plants across the globe in real time. With more than 60,000 machines are already connected world- wide, global companies like Audi, BorgWarner, Weir Minerals, Richards Industries and GKN Aerospace have already proven the value of this system, using the technology to substantially improve shop fl oor productivity and company competitive- ness by 20% or more. Forcam Inc.


Ph: 513-878-2780 Web site: www.forcam.com


Finishing Robots Company will showcase its fi nishing automation with a new tool-changing option for its Touch Robot. The Touch Robot is a table-top fi nishing system that uses the same hand tools (die grinders, belt grinders, grinding disks) that an operator would use. It accommodates part variation by working by force. Instead of rig- idly following prede- termined trajectories, it applies pressure to the part, which allows the part surface to determine the tool- path. By measuring


Factory Automation Software The newest release of Forcam Force shop-fl oor productivity software will be showcased at the show. The suite of mod- ules of newest release of Forcam Force delivers a factory- wide, cross-industry solution that combines the collection of machine and production data, visualization, alerts, labor tracking, and enterprise resource planning (ERP) integra- tion in real time. This Web-based solution integrates seam- lessly and quickly with the global standard MTConnect and guarantees extended competitiveness for users worldwide. The software works at the individual machine level, enabling manufacturing order data to be streamed from the top fl oor


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