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“We make a lot of couplings here, which again were two or sometimes three step operations: lathe, mill, and then some- times a key seat or a broaching machine. Now they’ll be done in one operation. The time savings are fantastic.” Each lathe has 12 tool stations, each of which can be configured with either a fixed turning tool or a rotary spindle operating at 5,000 RPM. Switching is plug-and-play, so the PUMAs offer built-in adaptability if Car- penter finds that their initial setup doesn’t meet all their needs. Carpenter also purchased a large horizon- tal boring mill, the DBC 130, which will be making lots of repair parts for their press and forge operations. It’s a 50,000 lb. mon- ster with over 2,200 ft.lbs. of torque, and automatic tool changer, and a W-axis with a programmable quill. Add to that a PUMA SMX 2600S multi-tasking turning center and a VM 960 vertical machining center, plus a Lynx 220 turning center for Latrobe and a DNM500 VMC for Orwigsburg. The SMX boasts right- and left-handle 35 HP spindles and 5-axis milling capabili- ties at 12,000 RPM. Its B-axis moves 120° in both directions. Maximum part weight is 2,000 lbs. with a turning diameter of 26 inches. Kissinger says the machine will be used both for repair parts and production components, particularly


titanium elec-


trodes. “We’re getting into powdered met- als in a big way.” The new vertical mill is part of a new pro- prietary project to perform non-destructive testing of their speciality steels. “We make raw material here in diameters up to 40 inches,” says Kissinger. “We’ll use the mill to make a standard that enables us to do ultrasonic testing to check for defects within the bars without actually cutting the piece.” The VM 960 is the second biggest vertical mill in Doosan’s current inventory, with X-Y travels of 2400 x 950 mm (94.5 x 37.4”) and low vibration motors with the highest spindle speed and torque in its class (12,000 RPM and 419.44 Nm (309.5 ft.-lbs.) respectively).


“... spot on for everything


we’ve run on it” Of course, Carpenter also had requirements for precision and throughput, and again found that Doosan delivered. Kissinger says “One of the reasons we went to outside vendors in the past was our inability to hold some of the required tolerances. We have finishing mills in which we hold a millionth of an inch in thickness from side to side, so the parts we manufacture to fit those ma- chines have to meet very tight tolerances, even down to plus or minus half a tenth on some of the parts. So far the Doosan VM960


vertical mill has been spot on for everything we’ve run on it. We’ve been running a lot of parts and it’s been just phenomenal. “But we’re not surprised because we looked at the quality of the build. The components that go into a machine tool are critical for holding the required tolerances, and when we looked at Doosan it was evident they use quality parts. Some of their competitors are not, even if their pricing is the same. That was big. The robustness of the equipment really shined, like having all boxed ways, slant beds, and Fanuc controls. “Their competitors wouldn’t offer these features yet would say the machines would cut the mustard. But when you talked with the end users they weren’t as happy as the salesman suggested. I didn’t hear one neg- ative comment about Doosan, and I called people I know from the industry without any prompt from Tom. For both service and reliability, Doosan was considered head and shoulders above the competitors.”


Getting good throughput on Large bushings on hot rolling mill rebuild are another repair item from among the 8,000+ handled by the machine shop.


increasingly tough material “When a part comes in,” explains Kissing- er, “it can be from a 50 year old mill. We don’t want to just replace it with another part that might last another three years if we can improve it so it lasts 15 years. There is no better steel in the world to make a re- pair part than some of the specialty steels we produce here. “Every time a job comes in a process engi- neer and several mechanical technicians study the failure and determine the cause and how we might prevent it next time, in consultation with our metallurgists and chemists. For example, we’ve repaired some gear boxes that used to have a ser- vice life of three to four years and after implementing a Carpenter alloy we’ll get 15 years out of them. “But the better the materials we come out with, the harder it is to machine it. That’s one of the things that amazes me about the Doosan machines. Even our small lathe has a lot of horsepower (25). You need that to machine the alloys we’re machining.” Kissinger says their 8 year old CNC mill took 45 to 50 minutes per part that the new Doosan vertical is making in 12 minutes. One reason is the Doosan’s Chip-Blaster through-the-spindle coolant system, en- abling them to run high performance Titex


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