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IMTS PAVILION: TOOLING AND WORKHOLDING


less than six minutes, while maintaining repeatability and changeover accuracy of < 0.002mm,” said Larson.


—Jim Lorincz


Tapping Attachments, Tap Holders Productivity on CNC lathes can be increased with live tooling using Tapmatic’s ASR, axial, and RSR, right-angle self-revers- ing tapping attach- ments. Tapping M8 × 1.25 holes with the ASR50 programmed at 2500 rpm is 32% faster than tapping the same holes on the


same machine with rigid tapping programmed at 4000 rpm. Tapmatic Corp. Ph: 800-854-601 Web site: www.tapmatic.com


Workholding Trifecta Self-centering vise, dovetail fi xtures and pinch blocks will be displayed. Self centering vises are used to hold a work- piece for either machining on the dovetail on a workpiece or a fi nished part; dovetail fi xtures to machine fi ve sides of a workpiece; and pinch blocks for machining second- ary or sixth side for dovetail removal. The RWP-502 is a 100- mm selfcentering vise with basic LWH dimensions of 165


±100 × 75.7 mm that weighs in at only 14 lb (6.35 kg). The vise automatically centers a workpiece within tolerance of ±0.013 mm with repeatability of 0.001 mm. The functionality of design includes reversible master jaws that will widen from 63.4 to 142.8 mm to accommodate a variety of workpiece sizes. The master jaws are adjustable from either end using a simple 12-mm socket wrench. Raptor Workholding Products Ph: 818-841-1785 Web site: www.raptorworkholding.com


Exchangeable Head Milling Cutter CoroMill 316 expands solid round tool capability by bring- ing higher levels of versatility and productivity to machining


116 AdvancedManufacturing.org | August 2016


operations in ISO P (steel) and ISO M (stainless steel) materials. CoroMill 316 is suitable for all general milling operations, including high-feed face milling, slot mill- ing, helical interpolation, shoulder milling, profi le milling and chamfer milling. The exchangeable heads allow users to easily and accurately switch between various op- erations, providing end mills with optimized radius variation, teeth frequency, geometry and grade. Coromant EH is the rotating modular interface of choice for applica- tions up to 32 mm in diameter. Integrated machine adapt- ers with EH coupling are recommended for small interfaces where gage line and swing diameter are critical (BT30, SK40, HSK40/50/63, ER, DTH), as well as different shank types in long overhang applications up to 35 mm in diameter. Sandvik Coromant Ph: 201-794-5000 Web site: www.sandvik.coromant.com/us


Platinum CVD-Coated Carbide Substrate AC8025P Grade for steel turning achieves higher productiv- ity and a longer tool life for signifi cantly reduced machin- ing costs. The tough carbide substrate features Absotech Platinum CVD coating, providing exceptional cutting edge chipping resistance and adhesion resistance. Signifi cant im- provements to the coating adhesion strength control residual stress and provide more than twice the chipping resistance as compared to con- ventional coatings, while maintaining wear resistance. A smooth surface treatment greatly improves adhesion resistance along the ridgeline of the cutting edge. When machining low-carbon steel, rolled steel and other ma- terials prone to adhesion, deterioration of the surface fi nish and reduced tool life may occur. AC8025P increases tool life stability and excellent edge sharpness greatly reduces chat- tering. The AC8025P grade is suitable for a wide variety of steel turning applications, including continuous cutting, light interrupted cutting, and interrupted cutting. Sumitomo Electric Carbide Inc. Ph: 800-950-5252 Web site: www.sumicarbide.com


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