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Laser Microgage provides precise right angle laser reference lines for alignment and checks for machinery squareness. Pinpoint Laser Systems Ph: 978-532-8001 Web site: www.pinpointlaser.com


Class IV Laser


Designed for larger part making applications that make enclosing the laser impractical, the Class IV Laser features a compact baseplate of 30 × 18" (762 × 457 mm), allowing for easy integra- tion into a wide range of appli- cations. The most popular confi gura- tion comes with the fi ber laser in SCHMIDT’s standard wattages ranging from 10 to 100 W. The Class IV also speeds up the marking process as there is no need to constantly open and close a cabinet door. SCHMIDT


Ph: 847-647-7117 Web site: www.gtschmidt.com


Multiaxis Laser Processing Trumpf’s TruLaser Cell 3000 is a fi ve-axis laser machine for fi ne cutting, precision welding and additive manufacturing. The machine offers cost-effi cient laser processing of 2D or 3D compo- nents, produc- ing high-quality results on small or medium-sized components. The machine is suit- able for one-off prototypes to high-


volume production. With solid-state laser options providing up to 8 kW of laser power, it is able to process a wide range of materials including nonferrous metals. The TruLaser Cell


Diamond


Cutting Head The Trident-2 dia- mond cutting head offers all the advan- tages of an integrated diamond design with the versatility of a re- placeable orifi ce car- tridge. Each Trident-2 diamond cartridge is precision machined around a simulated jet stream to ensure perfect orifi ce-to- nozzle alignment and the replaceable cartridge can be swapped out when a different orifi ce size is required, expanding the versatility of the cutting head. Barton


Ph: 518-798-5462 Web site: www.barton.com


Thermal Drilling With thermal drilling, it’s possible to form inserts out of the same part’s material, with the inserts proving just as strong —if not stronger—as the equivalent welded nut of the same diameter. The material, that is normally cut using the conven- tional drilling process, is friction-heated enough to displace it and form a bushing that triples the material thickness. This additional wall is then used to tap and form your own inserts. These tapped bushings are used instead of welded nuts, threaded nipples and inserts. The process can be used in drill presses, CNC, or milling machines. These built-in inserts can be formed in UNC, UNF, NPT, metric and metric fi ne threads in steel, stainless, aluminum and copper from 0.032 to ½" (0.813–12.7-mm) thicknesses. Hole diameters range from 0.059 to 1.5" (1.5–38.1 mm). Formdrill USA Ph: 773-290-1040 Web site: www.formdrill-usa.com


August 2016 | AdvancedManufacturing.org 201


3000 requires only a minimum fl oor space since the electrical control, cooling units and laser optics are all integrated into the machine. Trumpf Inc.


Ph: 860-255-6000 Web site: www.us.trumpf.com


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