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SHOP SOLUTIONS


the same. The company’s previous standard rate for turning was 400 sfm (121.9 m/min), 0.040 ipr (1 mm/rev), and 0.375" (9.5-mm) DOC, with the edge lasting less than 6" (152.4 mm) of feed. Mike led the trial with the T-Force 40, starting at the same feeds and speeds and 0.750" (19-mm) DOC. After tweaking for optimal tool life, the two settled on slightly lower speed and slightly higher feed, 300 sfm (91 m/min) and 0.045 ipr (1.14 mm/rev) at the same 0.750" (19-mm) DOC. At those rates, the cutting edge lasted through 28" (711 mm) of feed; almost 10 times the time in cut as before. In competitive trials, the nearest competitor reached 400 sfm (121.9 m/min) 0.040" (1 mm/rev) ipr, and 0.625" (15.88- mm) DOC. That was pretty close on metal removal rate (MRR), but the edge lasted through only 3" (76 mm) of feed, or one tenth of the T-Force 40’s time in cut.


In the double-lever clamping scheme, the insert is placed over two stakes on the seat, and then wedged into posi- tion when a stout captive screw is tightened. Besides being extremely secure, this arrangement eliminates juggling loose screws for indexing and presents an absolutely fl at top sur- face for unimpeded chip fl ow. To index, the operator loosens the captive screw half a


turn, lifts the insert off the stakes, rotates it to present the new edge, and retightens the screw. Trials with the Ingersoll Gold-Quad F face mill projected a


20% improvement in throughput vs. before and double the edge life. “The pricier the machine and the higher the hourly burden, the more important edge life and time-in-cut become,” said Stokes. Longer edge life also enabled completing a full pass on a 32' (9.75-m) long workpiece with no indexing stoppages. Final parameters with the Ingersoll tool were 900 sfm (274 m/min), 300 ipr (7620 mm/rev), and 0.125" (3.18- mm) DOC, vs. the previous 600/200/0.125 respec- tively. Any increase in rates burned up the inserts, forcing an indexing in mid-cut.


Competitive face mills did about as well on


Tooling team at Breaux Machines included from left to right: Ingersoll’s Mike Salewsky; Breaux’s Robert Stokes, plant manufacturing manager; and Breaux machinist/programmer David Studemeyer. Their tooling decisions literally doubled throughput capacity of their O-M VTL able to handle parts in the 90,000 lb (40,823-kg) range.


“Based on these trials, the Ingersoll T-Force 40 tool would give us the effect of a second VTL,” said Tommy Breaux. “This, at a time when there’s a real shortage of large-scale turning capacity to serve the oil and gas business. We gained both strategically and fi nancially.” Key to the T-Force 40’s performance is an insert with a longer cutting edge and free cutting insert geometry, seated rigidly in place with double-lever clamping. The combination enables exceptionally deep cuts without fracturing the insert or overloading the machine. Although Breaux limits DOCs to ¾" (19 mm) to protect the machine, the T-Force 40 tool geometry itself enables 1¼" (32-mm) DOCs.


48 AdvancedManufacturing.org | August 2016


throughput, but much less so on edge life. The in- serts were more expensive, moreover, which would raise MRO costs. Introduced less than two years ago, the Inger- soll Hi-Quad family of face mills has become the “go-to” solution for a variety of high-feed rough facing, profi ling and interrupted-cut applications. The extra-thick inserts handle both high feeds and deeper cuts, and their free-cutting geometries re- duce cutting forces. These lower forces enhance stability and reduce chatter in long-reach applica- tions. A strong, oversize clamping screw ensures secure seating under extreme cutting conditions.


A proprietary post coating technology smooths the surface and strengthens the bonds between coating and substrate to improve performance 35% on average. Today, Breaux uses these tools and settings as standard, with essentially the same results. Much of their work is in forg- ings of 4140 and 8620 high carbon and alloy steel. A typical piece is a round 4140 forging weighing 92,000 lb (41,730 kg) and measuring 128" (3251 mm) in diameter. “Although we’re making chips twice as fast as expected on the VTL, the ma- chine is busy almost all the time,” said Tommy Breaux. For more information from Ingersoll Cutting Tools, go to www.ingersoll-imc.com, or phone 815-387-6600.


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