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Doosan Machine Tools 7


and more. Some of Carpenter’s equipment dates back to 1910 and some is so mod- ern it’s just being installed now. But it all breaks. And when something breaks and a production line stops, the cost in lost rev- enue can easily reach $100,000 per hour. So Carpenter has long had on-site repair and rebuild shops at their main locations, working round the clock to make replace- ment parts. These shops had an interesting collection of mostly manual machine tools (including a 1948 Sellers boring mill), but they couldn’t keep up. That led to the for- mation of a team representing Carpenter’s three largest locations (Reading, Latrobe, & Orwigsburg) to study the issue.


Spending millions for outside machining, and hating the


turn-around time Kerry Kissinger, Machine Shop Manager at the Reading plant (Carpenter’s biggest) explains: “We looked at what parts were going out to other machine shops. We also tried to determine if parts being made at one Carpenter facility could be used at another. When we assembled all the infor- mation we realized we were spending 15 to 17 million dollars per year with outside machine shops. “On top of that, we constantly had to wait for parts, which is a huge hidden cost. There are situations in which a piece of equip- ment could be down 48 hours, losing two full days of production, because of a part we could have repaired within two hours with the right equipment. So the return on investment is great. It was just a question of getting our executives to see it.”


Size range, versatility, delivery, support: Doosan was perhaps uniquely qualified to meet all


the requirements Kissinger’s group developed a plan to buy new CNC machines to take 80% of their ma- chining in-house in stages over three years. Management quickly decided the num- bers were so compelling that they needed to make the investment immediately, and “immediately” meant 30 days since the decision fell near the end of a fiscal year. Kissinger and his team had already settled on Doosan as the best solution and Doosan maintains a large stock for just such contin- gencies. Even when Carpenter added a sev-


A few of the smaller repair parts made in Carpenter’s in-house machine shop. Besides a tremendous variation in size, the shop must handle materials ranging from tool steel, to high performance plastics, to Carpenter’s own high-tech alloys...and they have to juggle jobs as short as one part from among over 8,000 items


enth and eighth machine for the Latrobe and Orwigsburg locations, Doosan was able to meet the deadline.


Easy enough for a high mix,


low volume shop “We’re a high mix, low volume shop,” Kiss- inger explains. “A big run for us is 40 pieces. But we make roughly 8,000 different parts, a number that will grow as we start serving additional facilities. We rebuild all the hy- draulic cylinders, pneumatic cylinders, ac- cumulators, gear boxes, shafts, bushings, burnishing rolls...anything that moves out in the plant. It’s tough. We need to be able to changeover quickly. So ease of use was a critical factor. We looked at a lot of machine tool manufacturers. We visited a bunch of places and talked to a number of operators. Got the feel of a number of machines. We felt very confident in the Doosan line and the ease of programming. In fact, although we will be doing most programming off-line with PartMaker, we’re currently doing ev- erything on the machines.”


From bolts to behemoths, with


help from an outstanding dealer Carpenter also values Doosan’s ability to accommodate tremendous variation in part sizes. As Kissinger put it, “Pull-back rods for our press are 30 feet long with 80 mm threads. Our straightening and burnishing


rolls weigh ten to 15,000 pounds a piece. But we also have to manufacture small nuts and bolts made with proprietary materials that can handle the heat. So we needed a wide range of equipment. “We’ve always had machining, but very little CNC technology. We relied on Tom Welker of Precision Machine Tool Solutions (Doosan’s distributor in Eastern PA) to help with sizing the machines for our various part families and with decisions on things like whether we needed live tooling, a Y-axis on a given machine, and so forth. We showed Tom a lot of parts with the question: ‘What’s going to help us with this?’ Tom ensured we got the right product mix to handle our diverse set of parts, plus future plans.” For parts


requiring lots of turning, the


Reading plant opted for three PUMA lathes (models 2100M, 2600LY, and 5100LMB), covering everything from those small bolts to parts up to 650 mm (25.6”) in diameter and 2,129 mm (83.8 inches) in length. They’re tooled up similarly to provide over- lap so Carpenter can handle any backlogs that crop up. But they included a Y-axis on the 2600 for keyed shaft work. As Kissinger explains, “That had been a three step op- eration, with turning on a lathe, then usu- ally a boring mill to cut the key ways, then a different machine in which we’d come into the end to drill and tap holes. Now it’s one operation on the 2600LY.


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