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ADVANCED MANUFACTURING NOW Larry Turner


IIOT is ‘Magic’ Firmly Grounded in Reality a T


he technology behind the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) can be perceived as a magical solution. While the potential for “magic” remains high, the reality of implementing IIoT in


the factory requires a thoughtful approach, identifying your busi- ness needs and culture. According to Beth Parkinson, market development direc- tor of Rockwell Automation, “Manufacturers need to identify where their organization is today and assess where they want to be. Don’t make the mistake of changing your operation just for technology’s sake. Understand what parts of your opera- tion are creating challenges and where you see opportunities. Then ask yourself, what is the state of automation in our op- eration? Can it meet the needs today and for future strategies? How strong is the network and security infrastructure, and related policies?”


Other questions include: t Is the state of automation in our operation good as-is or are there excessive downtimes?


t Do we have tribal knowledge that we haven’t captured or automated that could create future problems?


t What decisions are we trying to make? t Where should we apply analytics?


According to Greg Giles, director of MES at RedViking, “Clients come to RedViking with specifi c issues, items and questions about problems with their industrial automation setup. Many don’t realize that their problems often tie into bigger opera- tional issues. RedViking often engages with clients to fi nd where the root issues lie by process integration to ERP or MES so that they can recognize the value of IIoT.” Sloan Zupan, senior product manager at Mitsubishi Electric Automation said, “The fi rst step to an effective IIoT strategy is to identify what risk you are trying to mitigate or what pain you want to resolve. Once identifi ed, build a business case that is action- able and outlines measurable results to increase buy-in from stakeholders who will fund and support the initiative.” Zupan added, “An IIoT strategy is best implemented around


specifi c use cases. From there you can add additional function- ality that addresses the next risk to avoid. The most successful


14 AdvancedManufacturing.org | August 2016


IIoT implementations are based on building blocks that address the largest challenges fi rst.” Giles stated, “We worked with a company’s operations team that was unclear about how to repair breakdowns in certain areas on the fl oor. They needed to know where to source parts and once repaired, wanted to understand and measure the success of the repair.” RedViking implemented an IIoT solution establishing trace-


ability on repairs helping to eradicate area confusion. The IIoT solution also helped the client company source parts and visibly reminded the team about repair history.


IIoT helps fuel better decisions about how to invest capital to address underperforming assets via data collection and analysis.


“Essentially, IIoT established documented evidence for spe-


cifi c units, including failure information and analytics on all unit failures and successes of repairs,” added Giles. Zupan added, “Mitsubishi Electric Automation works with customers who want short-term returns on their investment in IIoT. We help customers implement IIoT solutions to provide vis- ibility into manufacturing asset performance and energy usage.” IIoT helps fuel better decisions about how to invest capital to


address underperforming assets via data collection and analysis. What may be driving US manufacturers to incorporate IIoT is the utility of this technology in deconstructing our manufacturing workplace silos. Tribal knowledge led to the building of silos. For better or for worse, IIoT is the magic tool to fl ush out this knowl- edge, connect silos and render them transparent. Focusing on a solid business case and not solely on the im- mediate pursuit of big data is crucial. To learn more, visit Industrial Internet of Things experts at In- dustrial Automation North America 2016 at IMTS from Septem- ber 12–17, 2016. Also during IMTS, plan to attend the Global Automation and Manufacturing Summit to learn more about the latest initiatives and IIoT standards.


President & CEO Hannover Fairs USA


MODERN MANUFACTURING PROCESSES, SOLUTIONS & STRATEGIES


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