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Seasonal Checklist For Your HVAC


It's time to have your heating and air unit serviced. For a thorough tuneup, your HVAC contractor should check the following:


• Check thermostat settings.


• Tighten all electrical connections and measure voltage and current on motors.


• Lubricate all moving parts. Parts that lack lubrication cause friction in motors and increases the amount of electricity you use.


• Check and inspect the condensate drain in your central air conditioner, furnace and/or heat pump (when in cooling mode). A plugged drain can cause water damage in the house and affect indoor humidity levels.


• Check controls of the system to ensure proper and safe operation.


• Check all gas (or oil) connections, gas pressure, burner combustion and heat exchanger.


For more tips on keeping your HVAC running efficiently, please visit www.energystar.gov.


E


co-opvalue Co-ops Salute Their Special Month


ast Central Electric Cooperative is celebrating National Cooperative Month in October.


“Cooperatives Build” is the theme of Co-op Month this year. “This theme is perfect because co-ops work for their communities in many ways,” said Billy Moore, ECE director of member services.


Cooperatives Have Principles


Most co-ops adhere to seven key cooperative principles, which help build trust between the co-op, its members and the community. For example, the first principle is Voluntary and Open Membership, which means that co-ops are open to all people who are willing to accept the responsibility of membership. The second, Democratic Member Control, gives members a voice in the co-op's policies and decisions. Principle three is Member's Economic Participation, which states that members contribute equitably to, and democratically control, the capital of their co-op. Number four, Autonomy and Independence, says co-ops are independent entities controlled by their members. The fifth principle, Education, Training and Information, contributes to the development of the co-op by making sure employees are qualified to do their jobs and that members get the information they need


on co-op services. Cooperation Among Co-ops is number six. It ensures co-ops remain strong by helping one another.


Cooperatives Build Communit


The seventh cooperative principle is Concern for Community. Cooperatives work for the sustainable development of their communities through employee involvement in local organizations, contributions to community efforts and support for schools. ECE's Operation Roundup has donated over $1 million to local organizations and charities, while co-op employees give their time to various community organizations. ECE also supports youth through programs such as Youth Tour, Energy Camp, Operation Roundup scholarships, safety programs and a free energy curriculum for classrooms.


Cooperatives Build Jobs


Cooperatives generate jobs in their communities, keep profits local and pay local taxes to help support community services. Cooperatives often take part in community improvement programs, ensuring that everyone has an opportunity to benefit from the cooperative experience.


Through all of the above ways, cooperatives build a better world. For more information, visit www.coopmonth.coop.


Connect with East Central Electric on Facebook for updates on power outages and information on member benefits and services, energy saving tips and more. If you like what you see, we’d appreciate your “thumbs up.”


2 | OCTOBER 2016 | country living


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