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Celebrate Cooperative Month


Every year in October, nearly 900 electric coopera- tives celebrate their history and heritage.


Those celebrations involve the whole community because cooperatives are consumer- owned and operated.


Unlike electric companies that serve big cities, electric cooperatives subscribe to a business model that allows the people who buy their electric- ity to sit on their boards of directors. That means your neighbors are the ones creating policies for the utility. When consumers create guidelines and procedures, they are typically consumer-friendly. You can run for a seat on your electric cooperative’s board of directors if you want to. Or you can simply exercise your right to vote for the direc- tors you would like to sit on the board.


During October, be sure to shout, “Happy anniversary” to linemen who are working in your neighborhood and to cus- tomer service representatives who help you if you visit your utility’s headquarters. Don’t be surprised if they say it right back to you. They know you own the utility they work for.


Energy Vampires Can Suck Your Wallet Dry


This Halloween, be aware that the hungry little vampires who ring your doorbell aren’t the only ones you need to be afraid of. Energy vampires inside your home are sucking electricity right out of the wires – for no good reason. Energy vampires are appliances and electronic devices that you leave plugged in when nobody is using them. Even though they’re turned off, they still use small amounts of energy.


When you consider how many unused devices are plugged in around your home, their energy use can add up. In fact, they can add 10 percent or more to your monthly electric bill.


So when you turn something off, unplug it too – unless it has to be on all the time, like the refrigerator. Here are three examples of devices that waste energy when they’re plugged in but not in use: Chargers. You’ve got one for your phone, your tablet, your portable


speaker, your iPod – and what else? Once the device is fully charged it continues to draw electricity as long as it’s plugged in. And if you unplug the device from the charger but leave the charger plugged in, the charger continues to use – to waste – electricity. Cable box. If you leave yours plugged in all the time for convenience, you’re adding nearly $20 a year to your electric bill for energy you’re not using.


Computers. Your home office equipment, like the computer, printer


and scanner, don’t need to stay on all the time. Turn them off and unplug them when you’re finished using them for the day. Can’t remember to unplug them? Plug several devices into a power strip instead of into a wall outlet. Power strips allow the user to cut power to multiple devices at once. And unplug anything you rarely use, like the TV in the basement or the old stereo you haven’t turned on since you started downloading music.


Hidden Account Number Find Your Account Number and Win $25


If you see your account number in this newsletter, call our office, identify yourself and the number. We will credit your electric bill $25. The number may be located anywhere in the 7792-003 newsletter and is chosen at random. If you don’t know your account number, call our office or look on your bill. To get the credit, you must call before the next month’s newsletter is mailed.


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