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C A N A D I A N September 2016


V ELECTRALITE SUPPLEMENT TO OKLAHOMA LIVING


16th Annual Dignified Disposal of Unserviceable American Flags Ceremony


Tuesday, Oct. 11 6 p.m.


CVEC Seminole office


Two winning essays on ‘Why Should I be Patriotic?’ will be presented.


Free hamburgers, hot dogs & soft drinks provided


CVEC and local American Legion Posts welcome donations of U.S. Flags for this ceremony


Need a New Roof? Choose a Light Color


Dark-colored roof shingles absorb heat from the sun – and compete with your air conditioning system as it works its hardest to keep your home cool.


The effect is the same as wearing


a black T-shirt in the hot sun: It at- tracts heat rather than repelling it like a white shirt does.


So, the next time your roof needs replacing, choose a lighter color. Light colors reflect heat, while dark colors absorb it. When it’s hot outside, the lighter the color, the easier your roof will be on your air conditioning bill.


Because dark-colored shingles ab- sorb heat, they transfer it to your attic. Some roofers say dark shingles wear out faster than lighter ones because


they absorb so much heat.


If you love dark rooftops and de- cide to go with a deep-hued shingle, choose a high-quality product, and then insulate and ventilate your attic well so it can help counteract the extra heat gain.


The goal is to keep the attic air temperature about the same as the outside air temperature.


Another roofing tip: Metal roofs absorb about one-third less heat than asphalt shingles, according to re- search by the Florida Solar Energy Center. Homeowners who switch to metal roofing have reported saving up to 20 percent on their energy bills. Metal reflects heat and prevents it from seeping into your attic.


Celebrate Cooperative Month


Every year in October, nearly 900 electric cooperatives cel- ebrate their history and heritage. Those celebrations involve the whole community because cooperatives are consumer- owned and operated.


Unlike electric companies that serve big cities, electric co- operatives subscribe to a busines model that allows the people who buy their electricity to sit on their boards of directors. That means your neighbors are the ones cre- ating policies for the utility. When consumers create poli- cies, those policies typically are consumer-friendly. You can run for a seat on your electric cooperative’s board of directors if you want to. Or you can simply exercise your right to vote for the directors you would like to sit on the board. During October, be sure to shout, “Happy anniversary” to linemen who are working in your neighborhood and to customer service representatives who help you if you visit your utility’s headquarters. Don’t be surprised if they say it right back to you. They know you own the utility they work for.


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