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News Southwest Rural Electric Association October 2016


Mike Hagy has announced plans to step down from his duties as SWRE’s CEO. He will retire effective January 3, 2017. Hagy has served as the co-op’s manager/CEO since January 2006. Prior to that, for more than 11 years he was a credentialed member of the SWRE board of directors.


“SWRE is a special


organization,” Hagy said. “Our members, our employees and our board are fine people. I’ve been honored to work with all of them.” Hagy and his wife Debra live near Frederick and are longtime Southwest Rural members. He was named SWRE CEO-designate in 2005 after a long career in education which included a 15-year tenure as superintendent of Frederick Schools.


Much of Hagy’s growing up years were in the Weaver community west of Frederick where his parents were SWRE members. When he and Debra built their farm home in the early ‘80s, they powered it with electricity from SWRE. “There have been a lot of challenges,” Hagy said of his time as SWRE’s chief executive. “We’ve seen shifts in the power market, legislative threats at the federal and state levels, and especially difficulties related to ice storms and other weather events.” He notes that the 2010 and 2016 ice storms were particularly stressful. Both events decimated SWRE and WFEC transmission


Volume 63


Safety, Service, Satisfaction... One Member at a Time! Number 9


Hagy plans retirement from SWRE


Mike Hagy


and delivery lines, and resulted in extended outage periods. Even under those trying conditions, Hagy said that he most remembers the generosity and strength of SWRE’s members and employees.


Hagy is most proud, though, of strides that the co-op has made in technology, including automatic meter reading, digital mapping, and development of SWRE’s mobile app.


“These are all developments that have allowed the co-op to be responsive to the needs of co-op members and to provide better service,” he said. He’s also quick to talk about distributive generation. “We at SWRE want our members to view us as their energy company – not just for electricity, but for all their energy needs. That’s why we launched


programs related to geothermal energy, whole house generators, and solar energy.”


SWRE can’t stand still, Hagy said. While he’s proud of the changes that have been instituted during his years at the co-op’s helm, he looks forward to watching the organization’s continued growth and further changes from the vantage point of a member.


His plans for the future include more time to visit family, travel, hunting, church work, and attending Oklahoma State University football games. The Hagys have two sons and one grandchild.


Heath and daughter-in-law Erin live in Pekin, Illinois, with grandson Max who is two-and-a-half.


Holt and daughter-in-law Jenna live in Edmond, Oklahoma.


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