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October 2016 Westover joins SWRE operations


Jimmy Westover has joined SWRE as an apprentice lineman. He will be working in the co-op’s Texas territory, based from SWRE’s Vernon warehouse. Westover is a native of the Vernon area and a graduate of Vernon High School. He served for almost 10 years in the U.S. Army, and has worked at the North Texas State Hospital and the Oklahoma Department of Corrections. Westover and his wife Petrina currently reside in Frederick but will relocate to Vernon in the near future. They are parents of two sons, Kolton who is 11 and Woodrow, 10


months. Jimmy Westover


Don’t be fooled by common energy myths Some common myths about


effective energy use may be costing you money.


Myth: The higher the thermostat setting, the faster the home will heat (or cool).


Many people think that walking into a chilly room and raising the thermostat to 85 degrees will heat the room more quickly. This is not true. Thermostats direct a home’s HVAC system to heat or cool to a certain temperature. Drastically adjusting the thermostat setting will not make a difference in how quickly you feel warmer. The same is true for cooling. The Department of Energy recommends setting your thermostat to 78 degrees during summer months, and 68 degrees during winter months.


Myth: Ceiling fans keep your home cool while you’re away.


Ceiling fans cool people, not rooms. Ceiling fans circulate room air but do not change the temperature. A running ceiling fan in an empty room is only adding to your electricity use. Remember to turn fans off when you’re away and reduce your energy use.


Myth: Opening the oven door to check on a dish doesn’t really waste energy.


Opening the oven door does waste


energy. Every time the oven door is opened, the temperature inside is reduced by as much as 25 degrees, delaying the progress of your dish and costing you additional money. If you need to check the progress of a dish, try using the oven light instead.


What’s Cookin’ in the SWRE Kitchen 4 cups water


3 cubes chicken bouillon 1 onion, chopped


1 banana pepper, seeded and diced 1 (15.5 oz) can hominy, drained


1 (15.5 oz) can black beans, rinsed and drained 1 (15.5 oz) can garbanzo beans, rinsed and drained


1 (14 oz) can diced tomatoes w/ green chilies, undrained


1 (14.5 oz) can diced tomatoes, undrained 2 (10.75 oz) cans cream of chicken soup 2 (12.5 oz) cans white chicken, drained 4-1/2 tsp garlic powder 3 Tbs lime juice


5 dashes hot pepper sauce 3 Tbs dried cilantro 1 tsp chili powder 1 tsp ground cumin salt and pepper to taste


Directions


1. Bring water to boil in a large pot. 2. Stir the bouillon cubes into water until dissolved.


5. Serve with tortilla chips, sour cream, and sliced avocado.


3. Add all other ingredients. Stir. 4. Reduce heat to medium and cook the soup until the onions are soft and opaque (about 20 minutes)


Easy Chicken Tortilla Soup SWRE News


Joe Wynn, SWRE News editor Board of Trustees


Dan White, Pres. ................ District 7 Don Ellis, Vice Pres. ........... District 1 Don Proctor, Sec. ............... District 3 Dan Lambert ....................... District 2 Ray Walker ......................... District 4 Dan Elsener ........................ District 5 Ronnie Swan ...................... District 6 Carl Brockriede ................... District 8 Jimmy Holland .................... District 9


Southwest Rural Electric Assn. P.O. Box 310


700 North Broadway Tipton, OK 73570-0310 1-800-256-7973


SWRE News is published monthly for distribution to members of South west Rural Electric Association.


Payments can be made at SWRE, 700 North Broadway, Tipton, OK 73570.


Online payments can be


made at www.swre.com or utilizing the SWRE app for phones and tablets. Payments may also be made at the following area banking institutions:


Oklahoma


Altus – Frazer Bank, National Bank of Commerce


Blair – Peoples State Bank Snyder – All American Bank Frederick – BancFirst, Frazer Bank


Texas


Chillicothe – American National Bank


Crowell – State Bank Electra – Waggoner National Bank


Vernon – Herring Bank, Waggoner Bank, Bank of the West


NOTE: When paying at a bank, allow 7-10 days prior to the bill’s due date.


SWRE Statement of Non-Discrimination


Southwest Rural Electric Association is an equal opportunity provider and employer. If you wish to file a Civil Rights program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, found online at http://www.ascr.usda. gov/complaint_filing_cust.html, or at any USDA office, or call (866) 632-9992 to request the form. You may also write a letter containing all of the information requested in the form. Send your completed complaint form or letter to us by mail at U.S. Department of Agriculture, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410, by fax (202) 690-7442 or email at program.intake@usda.gov.


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