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Electrical Safety Tips for Kids


By Kaley Lockwood


At Harmon Electric, we understand your child’s health and well- being are one of your top priorities. With more than 140,000 electrical fi res occurring each year, knowledge of electrical safety is necessary to ensuring your loved ones stay safe. Here are a few tips you can share with your little ones:


• Electrical fi res are caused when a wire or electrical device overheats. It is important to make sure your children understand that water cannot extinguish this type of fi re. Only fi re extinguishers can be used to remedy this situation.


• In addition to the previous tip, it is never a good idea to mix water with electricity. Keep blow dryers, radios and any other electrical devices away from all water, especially those used in a bathroom.


• Keep metal objects out of appliances and plugs. If a piece of toast gets stuck in the toaster, never use a metal knife to retrieve it. Unplug the toaster, and use a different tool or utensil to remove the toast. Remember, only plugs should go in outlets. Sticking fi ngers or other objects in outlets may result in an electrical shock.


• It’s always a good idea to turn lights off when they are not in use. This will save your family money on your electric bill and prevent electrical fi res from overheated bulbs.


• Kids will be kids, and they love the great outdoors. Remind them to avoid overhead power lines. Whether they are climbing trees or fl ying kites or remote-controlled toys, they should always be mindful of what is above.


Talk to your children about the importance of electrical safety, and more importantly, lead by example - because you never know who’s watching. For more information about electrical safety, visit SafeElectricity.org or esfi .org. 162903


Harmon Electric celebrates


National Cooperative Month


October is National Cooperative Month, and Harmon Electric, and all co-ops across the U.S., are celebrating the benefi ts and values that cooperatives bring to their members and communities.


the economy, seven cooperative principles set us apart from other businesses:


1. voluntary and open membership 2. democratic member control 3. member’s economic participation 4. autonomy and independence 5. education, training and information 6. cooperation among cooperatives 7. concern for community.


box’ businesses,” says Charles Paxton, General Manager. “The co-op business model is unique and rooted in our local communities. Co-ops help us build a more participatory, sustainable, and resilient economy.” Harmon Electric is proud to be part of America’s cooperative network, which includes more than 47,000 cooperative businesses.


“Today, people prefer options and alternatives to ‘big Happy Fall! NO. OF OUTAGES


10 1 2 9 1 4 2 1 1 1


11


Harmon Electric is one of more than 900 electric cooperatives, public utility districts and public power districts serving 42 million people in 47 states. To learn more about Harmon Electric Association, visit


www.harmonelectric.com.


MONTHLY OUTAGE REPORT August, 2015


CAUSE OF OUTAGE


Lightning Wire burnt up in loop Member side short Weather, Other WFEC Animal Trees Tractor Pulled Line Down Tractor Hit Pole Connector burnt up Unknown


NO. OF METERS AFFECTED


17 1 2


333


1,092 51 19 1 9 1


534


For the month of August, Harmon Electric experienced 43 separate outages. The total members affected were 2,060 with an average time off of 1.63 hours. WFEC had the largest outage. Weather and unknown causes also played a big part. Stay safe!


While co-ops operate in many industries and sectors of


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