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Celebrate Cooperative Membership In October very October is


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Best Device For Safe Halloween: Your Front Porch Light


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ou know how to keep your kids safe on Oct. 31: Dress them in bright costumes, keep them in your sight as they visit the neighbors’ homes and check their candy before they eat it. But you also need to make your yard and home safe if little goblins will be ringing your doorbell on Fright Night. Here’s how to prep your house for their arrival:


Replace your porch light so there’s no chance it will burn out in the middle of the fun.


Keep the light turned on until you run out of candy. The light lets trick-or-treaters know they are welcome and keeps your porch or steps illuminated to prevent falls.


• Use the holiday as a good excuse to place some security lighting or outdoor lighting around the house. Proper lighting will keep you and your visitors safe.





If you decorate for Halloween, choose lighted decorations that


are certified by a safety organization like UL, which has standards for safety and performance.


• Connect no more than three strands of decorative lights together. Inspect them first for damaged cords and always unplug them before replacing bulbs.


• Use outdoor, heavy-duty extension cords for outdoor lighting jobs, and don’t overload them.


• Move cords out of the way of the home’s entrance so visitors won’t trip over them as they rush to your front door in the dark.


Choctaw Electric Cooperative provides free electrical safety programs for local groups. Visit wwwchoctawelectric.coop for more details, or contact Brad Kendrick at 800-780-6486.


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Cooperative Month—a time to celebrate the reasons why consumer- owned businesses like Choctaw Electric Cooperative are important to your local economy and your family.


From your electric cooperative to your credit union, businesses that were created and are governed by the people who use them help keep your money in your local community.


They also give you a say when it comes to policies and decisions. Choctaw Electric and other cooperative businesses are run by boards of directors who are also members of the cooperative. These member/ directors are elected by all of the other members who “belong” to the business.


If you meet the qualifications for trustee listed in the CEC bylaws, you can even run for a seat on the Choctaw Electric board of trustees. You can also exercise your right to vote in


elections; attend your cooperative’s


membership meetings; and keep up with Choctaw Electric activities via your co-op newsletter, website and Facebook page.


Perhaps you “joined” Choctaw Electric because it is the only power supplier for your area. That still makes you a co-owner of your utility, along with all of the others in your area who get their electricity from the cooperative.


Take advantage of the privilege of cooperative membership, starting with Cooperative Month in October. Attend your co-op functions, vote on matters of importance, and keep abreast of “your” business’s activities.


You are a member and an owner of your electric cooperative. That benefit should never be taken for granted.


Let’s Talk Safety— For The Kid’s Sake!


Your co-op offers safety programs for local organizations, and classrooms. We also offer a free energy curriculum for schools that includes fun facts and resource material on energy efficiency and electrical safety. For details, please call your co-op at 800-780-6486, or visit www.choctawelectric.coop.


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