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PAGE 2 | OCTOBER 2015 Start saving with a DIY home energy audit


As temperatures begin to drop and your energy focus turns from cooling your home to heating it, consider using this time to increase energy effi ciency and cost savings for the colder months ahead. Whether your home is old or new, chances are you are spending more on energy costs than necessary.


Armed with some basic knowledge and a little time, you can conduct a baseline energy audit of your home to identify where you are losing energy (and money). Use a checklist and take notes on problems you fi nd as you walk through your home. Remember, the audit itself won’t save you money unless you act on your fi ndings.


DIY 101


So, where to start? If your home has multiple levels, work from the top down. Begin in your attic or highest fl oor, and work your way down to the fi rst fl oor or basement.


1. Insulation and air leaks (drafts) – According to the Department of Energy, improving your home’s insulation and sealing air leaks are the fastest and most cost-eff ective ways to reduce energy waste and make the most of your energy dollars. Check to see whether there is suffi cient insulation in the attic. Are openings containing piping, ductwork and chimney sealed?


2. Electronic devices – Inventory all of the electronic devices you have and how often you use them. Computers, printers, DVD players, phones and gaming consoles are notorious “vampire power” users – they drain energy even when not in use. If items can be turned off without disrupting your lifestyle, consider plugging them into a power strip that can be turned on and off (or put on a timer).


3. Lighting – Note where you still have incandescent lights. Can you replace them with CFL or LED upgrades? Do you have nightlights? If so, consider replacing them with LED nightlights. Are there places where you can install motion sensor lights in low use areas, such as a closet, porch or garage?


4. T ermostat/indoor temperature – Do you have a programmable thermostat? When was the last time it was programmed? Is the date and time correct? If they are not,


Energy Effi ciency Tip of the Month


this could throw off the automatic settings. Is it set so the temperature is lower during the day and/or times when no one is home and at night when people are sleeping? Consider lowering the temperature a few degrees.


5. Appliances and cleaning – Appliances are large energy users, and if yours are more than 10 years old, they are likely not as energy effi cient as today’s options. How and when you use them also make a diff erence. Do you wash your clothes in hot water, or can you use cold water instead? Do you use your washer, dryer or dishwasher during the day? Consider running them at night, during off -peak times. Does your hot water heater have a blanket? If not, consider insulating it. Make sure your dryer vent isn’t blocked – this will not only save energy, it may also prevent a fi re.


Evaluation


Once you have completed the audit, take a look at the fi ndings. Prioritize actions that you can take based on your time and budget, weighing where you can get the most impact for your investment. Increasing your home’s energy effi ciency will make your family comfortable while saving you money. n


Don’t let vampires suck the life out of your energy effi ciency eff orts! Unplugging unused electronics – otherwise known as “energy vampires” – can save you as much as 10 percent


on your electric bill. Source: Energy.gov


Electrical Safety Tip of the Month


Check ceiling fans regularly for a wobble, which will wear out the motor over time. To fi x the wobble, turn off power to the ceiling fan, and tighten the screws.


Source: Electrical Safety Foundation International


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