This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Vol. 66 Number 12


News orthwestern Electric October 2015


October is national cooperative month Celebrate what membership truly means


O


ctober is National Coopera- tive Month, and for the many different types of co-ops in the


U.S., it’s the time of year to celebrate what membership truly means. You could be a member of a lot of different places—a gym, a 4-H club, a book of the month club—the list goes on and on! But what makes being a member of a co-op different?


The simple answer to that question is when you are a member of a co-op, you are also an owner. You own a stake in our business, and just like any stakeholder, there are many benefits to your membership. As a member of Northwestern Electric, you have a say in the representatives who are elected to serve on the co-op’s board of direc- tors. You have an opportunity to make


your voice heard every year at our Annual Meeting. You get a say on policy issues your electric cooperative supports or opposes. You can even help to determine how your profits are redistributed.


Our bottom line is provid- ing you with safe, reliable and affordable electricity. Sure, we have to think about expenses, overhead and other aspects of daily business, but when we have a little left over, we send it right back to you. Whether we return it to you in the form of a bill credit or a check—you have a say in where that money goes! And returning capital credits to you is a major part of why being a co-op member matters.


Unlike investor-owned utilities that pay dividends to their stock- holders who are often far removed from the service provided, coop- eratives return their margins to the members—those who used the service and provided an important investment. This year, NWEC returned $996,825 in Capital Credits to its members. This practice is known as members’ economic participa- tion and is included in the Rochdale Principles—a set of guidelines all cooperatives follow.


ONE MEMBER, ONE VOTE


Perhaps the most unique aspect of a cooperative is its democrati- cally organized leadership system. Each co-op member receives one vote on official business. It doesn’t matter how much electricity you use or how many meters you have, all members have an equal say. This is contrary to an investor-owned com- pany where the amount of money invested determines the amount of control each shareholder maintains.


Inside


Halloween hazards .......2 Missing members .........3 Recipe ............................3 Value added services ...4


As your local electric co-op, we get to be a part of this community. When we think about membership, we think about all of the ways we can give back to you, our members—and that’s what matters most to us.


Three benefits of being a co-op member CAPITAL CREDITS


DISTRICT & ANNUAL MEETINGS


As a member of NWEC, you have the opportunity to attend two important meetings for the Coopera- tive—district and annual meeting. They give you the chance to become involved in the operation of your Cooperative by electing the direc- tors who represent you or voting on policy changes when the need arises. You’ll also hear updates as to the changes and progress over the past year of your Cooperative and where we are headed in the future.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132