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THE NEED FOR FEED S


By Jocelyn Pedersen


cott and Denise Cindle live in a place where Denise Cindle said there are “probably more cattle and horses than people.” When the desire for a little extra family income met the need to buy feed closer to home, the Canadian Valley Electric Cooperative couple


opened Cindle Feed on their property in Paden, Okla. The small feed operation has turned into a family affair with 12-year-old Bailey and 7-year-old Brittany helping out in the store. Brittany said she carries dog food to customers’ cars, and when she gets big enough, she’ll help with the heavier feed sacks. Bailey helps write customer tickets and load ev- erything else. One customer asked about a sick lamb and when Bailey, who wants to be a veterinarian, suggested a possibly malady, the woman took the lamb to the vet only to fi nd Bailey had been correct all along. Although the family-run feed store has been open just under a year, they


have a loyal clientele. Judy Bailey said she’s been trading with the Cindles since they opened. She buys minerals and vitamins for her cattle, and feed for her rabbits, dogs and chickens. Bailey appreciates that she no longer has to drive between 17 and 25 miles to a feed store. The Cindles are “really good to get anything I need,” she said. Tracey Dean, a member of East Central Oklahoma Electric Cooperative,


said she’s known the Cindles “forever.” Dean comes to Cindle Feed usually once a week because they carry the several types of feed she uses. “I love it,” Dean said of having a feed store nearby which keeps her from having to drive to Okeema or Shawnee, adding that the Cindles are “very competitive on prices. She’s pretty much beat everywhere I’ve gone. The main draw for me is competitive prices and everything they carry.” According to Denise Cindle, it’s easy to keep prices competitive because the family feed store is run out of a metal building on their property, so overhead is low. “We know what it’s like to be on the other side of the counter and to be parents. We know what it’s like to buy show feed and keep up with your animals. We try to keep prices as low as possible,” Denise Cindle said. Neighbors helping neighbors is what it’s all about. When the Cindles de- cided to open their feed store, Kirby McEntire, who shows chickens, wanted them to stock poultry products. Denise Cindle said McEntire helped them learn what to stock for chickens. Because the Cindles want to know their products they attempt to try ev- erything they sell in the store to share with customers their personal experiences. Cindle said they carry hard-to-fi nd items like Big Fluffi es bedding which she described as “white gold in the show world,” and she should know be- cause both of her girls show pigs. According to Cindle, the store has had customers drive as far as two-and-a half hours to buy them. Other products


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Above: The Cindle family created a feed store on their own property to support community needs. Photo by Jocelyn Pedersen


Paden


Fulfi lling “


You never know what you’ll fi nd when you drive up.


” - Denise Cindle, co-owner


include Big V, Linder, Show-Rite and MoorMan’s feeds for all kinds of livestock, as well as Boss Buck deer feeders and plot mix for hunters. Denise Cindle said a plus to having the feed store at the house is “sometimes farmers go out in the evening and they fi nd a calf and they need something; they know since we’re at the house, they can stop by and we can help them. Many people have told us how appreciative they are that we are fl exible.” Denise Cindle’s favorite part of running a feed store is getting to visit with customers.


“I’ve been in this community all my life,” Cindle said. “There are people I’ve really gotten to know since we’ve opened the store. We have people who come in Rangers and those who just need something small so they ride their horse. You never know what you’ll fi nd when you drive up.”


“I’m proud they opened a feed store,” McEntire said. “We needed something like this in our community.” Scott Cindle summed up the neighbor-to-neighbor experience when


he said, “It’s been quite the adventure. It’s nice to know people are ap- preciative of us being out here, that we’re meeting a niche here in Paden.” For more information, call Cindle Feed at 405-932-4645 or follow


them on Facebook.


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